Combat Maneuvers

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During combat, you can perform maneuvers that can hinder or even cripple your foe. Although these maneuvers have vastly different results, they all use a similar mechanic to determine success.

Performing a Combat Maneuver

  • To perform any combat maneuver, you make a Maneuver Offense roll, rolling a d20 and adding your Maneuver Offense modifier, and if it equals or exceeds your target's Maneuver Defense, your maneuver is successful, inflicting the listed effect of the maneuver and a small amount of damage.
  • Some maneuvers, such as bull rush, have varying levels of success depending on how much your attack roll exceeds the target's Maneuver Defense. Rolling a natural 20 while attempting a maneuver is always a success (except when attempting to escape from bonds), while rolling a natural 1 is always a failure. In no way is a natural 20 on a maneuver ever a critical.
  • Maneuvers are considered to be attacks. As a result, they do damage (just a little), and may benefit from damage buffs such as a Warlord's Formation dice, a Bard's song, a Paladin's Smite, and may be used to lay a Fighter's Challenge. They may not be used to add other types of precision damage, such as a Rogues Sneak Attack, Ranger's Quarry, etc.
  • Maneuvers benefit from bonuses to hit, such as flanking or a Warlord's Battle Standard.
  • When performing a maneuver, you must use an action appropriate to the maneuver you are attempting to perform.
  • Maneuvers may only be attempted on your turn, never as part of an attack of opportunity or a bonus attack, such as an attack granted by Haste (Spell).
  • Each maneuver may only be performed once per round. This means a character can't use two attacks to perform a pair of trips in the same round, but could use those two attacks to perform a trip and a sunder.
  • If your target is immobilized, unconscious, or otherwise incapacitated, your maneuver automatically succeeds (treat as if you rolled a natural 20 on the attack roll). This allows you to drag or reposition unconscious creatures automatically, for example.
  • If your target is suffering any condition which denies it an action of any type, you receive a +4 bonus on your attack roll to perform a maneuver against it. This applies to the automatic success rule, above, and may increase the effects of your maneuver against a foe.
  • If the target creature has concealment (miss chance), cover, or otherwise inflicts penalties on attacks made against it, those same penalties are also applied to any Maneuver Offense rolls made to perform combat maneuvers against it.

Maneuver Offense

Disambiguation: Maneuver Offense was formerly known as Combat Maneuver Bonus (CMB)
Each character and creature has a maneuver offense value that represents its skill at performing maneuvers. The combat maneuvers are:
A creature's maneuver offense is determined using the following formula:
Character Level + (STR modifier -or- DEX modifier) + Size modifier
  • Size Modifier: Fine -4, Diminutive -3, Tiny -2, Small -1, Medium +0, Large +1, Huge +2, Gargantuan +3, Colossal +4, Titanic +5.
  • Feats: Some feats and abilities grant a bonus to your maneuver check when performing specific maneuvers.
  • Penalties: Any penalties to a creature's attack rolls also apply to its maneuver offense. For example, targeting a creature with partial cover inflicts a -4 penalty to both attack rolls and maneuver offense checks on the creature attacking it.

Maneuver Defense

Disambiguation: Maneuver Defense was formerly known as Combat Maneuver Defense (CMD)
Each character and creature has a Maneuver Defense value that represents its ability to resist maneuvers such as Trip, Overrun and Bull Rush, among many other uses. A creature's Maneuver Defense is determined using the following formula:
10 + ½ Character Level (Round Down) + STR modifier + DEX modifier + Dodge AC + Deflection AC + Size Modifier
  • Size Modifier: Fine -4, Diminutive -3, Tiny -2, Small -1, Medium +0, Large +1, Huge +2, Gargantuan +3, Colossal +4, Titanic +5.
  • Feats: Some feats and abilities grant a bonus to your Maneuver Defense when resisting specific things.
  • Miscellaneous Modifiers: If the creature has any of the following bonus types granting a bonus to its armor class, they are also applied to its Maneuver Defense:
Circumstance, Insight, Luck, Martial, Morale, Profane, and Sacred
  • Penalties: Any penalties to a creature's AC also apply to its Maneuver Defense for physical attacks. For example, a flat-footed creature does not add its Dexterity bonus to its Maneuver Defense against a Trip maneuver.

Basic Maneuver Damage

  • In addition to the special effects of the chosen maneuver, you may also deal damage to the creature equal to the base weapon damage of the weapon you are wielding, not including any adders (such as enhancement bonuses, STR modifiers, feats, spell effects, precision damage, bonus damage, etc). Note that base weapon damage increases at 8th, 15th, 22nd and 29th levels, which also improves the damage done by maneuvers. If you want to do more damage with a combat maneuver, you can take feats to improve your combat maneuvers, or use weapons which are good at certain combat maneuvers.
  • If you have natural or class-based non-weapon attacks, you may roll just the dice you would normally roll for an attack you are allowed to make during an attack of opportunity, not including any adders (such as enhancement bonuses, STR modifiers, feats, spell effects, precision damage, bonus damage, etc).
Example: a 3rd level fighter would roll just the dice from his +1 longsword (1d8), while a 3rd level Monk would roll just the dice of his Echoing Strike attack (2d8), and a 3rd level Brawler would roll just the dice of his Cross attack (also 2d8).
  • Maneuvers cannot critically hit.

Bull Rush

You attempt to shove an enemy creature back, moving into its recently-vacated space. Bull rush is excellent for breaking up defensive lines of enemies, or forcing an enemy into a better position for your allies to exploit.
Type of Action: Standard action, or as part of a charge, in place of the melee attack.
Requirements:
  • A Bull Rush may only be attempted against an adjacent target. If you have a reach weapon or any other method of extending your combat reach, this does not extend the range of Bull Rush.
  • You can only bull rush an opponent who is no more than one size category larger than you.
  • A bull rush maneuver can only push an opponent straight back from the square of the attacker. If you do not have Bull Rush, Improved (Feat), or a similar ability, initiating a bull rush provokes an attack of opportunity from the target of your maneuver. If that attack of opportunity hits, you take damage as normal, but otherwise suffer no penalty on your Maneuver Offense for the bull rush attempt.
  • You cannot bull rush a creature into a square that is occupied by a solid object or obstacle.
  • If there is another creature in the way of your bull rush, and you wish to bull rush both of them, you must immediately make a Maneuver Offense check to bull rush that creature as well. You take a -4 penalty on this check for each creature being pushed beyond the first. Note that you cannot damage ANY creature except the first one you Bull Rush. If you are successful on all rolls to bull rush multiple creatures in a line, you can continue to push the creatures a distance equal to the smallest result.
Example: A fighter bull rushes a goblin for a total of 15 feet, but there is another goblin in a straight line 5 feet behind the first. He may stop the bull rush after five feet, or he may make another Maneuver Offense check against the second goblin (at -4) after having pushed the first 5 feet. If this check reveals that he can push the second goblin a total of 20 feet, he can continue to push both goblins another 10 feet (since the first goblin will have moved a total of 15 feet, which is the lesser result). If the second roll showed he could push the second goblin only five feet, he can push both goblins another five feet (the lesser result) and then both stop.
If Successful:
  • If your Combat Maneuver attack is successful, your target is pushed back 5 feet, and you deal basic combat maneuver damage to it. For every 5 by which your Maneuver Offense check exceeds your opponent's Maneuver Defense you can push the target back an additional 5 feet.
  • You can follow the target if you wish, moving into the space you pushed the creature out of. If the creature took up more space than you do, you may choose to occupy any of its recently vacated squares as long as they are available for normal movement, and you fit into them.
  • The movement caused by Bull Rush is considered forced movement. An enemy being pushed by a bull rush does not provoke attacks of opportunity for leaving a threatened square unless you possess Bull Rush, Greater (Feat).
If Unsuccessful:
  • If your Maneuver Offense attack fails, the target is not budged from its space, and your movement ends in front of the target. You may continue your turn if you have actions remaining.

Dirty Trick

Type of Action: Standard action

  • A Dirty Trick may only be attempted against an adjacent creature. If you have a reach weapon or any other method of extending your combat reach, this does not extend the range of Dirty Trick.
  • This maneuver covers any sort of situational attack that imposes a penalty on a foe for a short period of time. Examples include kicking sand into an opponent's face to blind him for 1 round, pulling down an enemy's pants to halve his speed, or hitting a foe in a sensitive spot to make him sickened for a round.
  • The GM is the arbiter of what can be accomplished with this maneuver, but it cannot be used to impose a permanent penalty, and the results can be undone if the target spends a move action (unless a feat makes that into a standard action).
  • If you do not have the Improved Dirty Trick feat or a similar ability, attempting a dirty trick provokes an attack of opportunity from the target of your maneuver. If that attack of opportunity hits, you take damage as normal, but otherwise suffer no penalty on your Maneuver Offense for the dirty trick attempt.
  • If your combat maneuver attack is successful, the target takes a penalty. The penalty is limited to one of the following conditions:
  • The condition inflicted by Dirty Trick maneuvers lasts for 1 round. For every 5 by which your attack exceeds your opponent's Maneuver Defense, the penalty lasts 1 additional round. This penalty can usually be removed if the target spends a move action.
  • If you possess the Greater Dirty Trick feat, the penalty lasts for 1d4 rounds, plus 1 round for every 5 by which your attack exceeds your opponent's Maneuver Defense. Alternatively, the target may spend a standard action to end the condition sooner.

Disarm

Type of Action: You can attempt to disarm your opponent in place of a melee attack. If you make a Disarm attempt with a secondary melee attack which is at less than your full BAB, your Maneuver Offense is penalized an equal amount for the Disarm attempt. IE, you take a -5 to the Maneuver Offense for your second attack, a -10 for your third attack, etc.

  • A Disarm can be attempted against any creature you threaten.
  • If you do not have the Improved Disarm feat, or a similar ability, attempting to disarm a foe provokes an attack of opportunity from the target of your maneuver. If that attack of opportunity hits, you take damage as normal, but otherwise suffer no penalty on your Maneuver Offense for the disarm attempt.
  • Attempting to disarm a foe while unarmed imposes a -4 penalty on the Maneuver Offense roll, unless you have the Improved Unarmed Strike feat.
  • If your combat maneuver attack is successful, your target drops one item it is wielding of your choice (even if the item is wielded with two hands).
  • If your attack exceeds the Maneuver Defense of the target by 10 or more, the target drops the items it is carrying in both hands (maximum two items if the target has more than two hands). Yes, you can knock both the sword AND the shield out of a foes hands.
  • If your attack fails by 10 or more, you drop the weapon that you were using to attempt the disarm, if any.
  • A successfully disarmed weapon, or weapons, always fall into the square of the creature from which they were disarmed. Retrieving an item from the ground is a move action. Note that some feats allow disarmed weapons to be moved to other squares, in which case the disarmed creature must first move to the square in question to retrieve it.
  • When a player character is disarmed, they may not make attacks with the disarmed weapon until they either retrieve it (using a move action) or draw a different weapon with which to attack.
  • When a Monster write-up indicates that they use a weapon to attack, they may expend a move action to retrieve the weapon and attack normally. If they cannot retrieve the weapon, they may still make attacks at -2 to hit, but when they hit, they do not roll their damage, instead inflicting only the bonus to their damage dice (e.g. a creature that normally deals 3d6+11 would only deal 11 points of damage). Any special conditions and effects are adjudicated by the referee on a case-by-case basis.
  • When a Monster write-up indicates that they use natural weapons (claw, claw, bite) to attack, Disarm may still be used against the creature. A successful Disarm Maneuver knocks the creature off-balance, twists their appendages into each other, confuses them, or otherwise hampers their ability to attack. Exactly as monsters using a weapon, a natural weapons user who is disarmed may still make attacks at -2 to hit, but when they hit, they they do not roll their damage, instead inflicting only the bonus to their damage dice (e.g. a creature that normally deals 3d6+11 would only deal 11 points of damage). Any special conditions and effects are adjudicated by the referee on a case-by-case basis. The creature may expend a move action to reorient itself and get rid of this penalty. These same rules apply to brawlers, monks and other player-characters who fight without weapons that are disarmed.

Drag

Type of Action: Standard action

In many ways, a Drag combat maneuver is a Bull Rush maneuver in reverse.

  • A Drag may only be attempted against adjacent figures. If you have a reach weapon or any other method of extending your combat reach, this does not extend the range of Dirty Trick.
  • If your Drag is successful, you may move one or more squares (depending on the degree of success; see below) as part of the Standard Action used to perform the Drag. The foe is moved along with you. If the creature takes up more space than you do,it must fit without squeezing into every square of the path your choose to drag it through.
  • You can only drag an opponent who is no more than one size category larger than you.
  • The aim of this maneuver is to drag a foe in a straight line from its space through the space the attacker occupies when the roll is made and possibly further.
  • If you do not have the Improved Drag feat or a similar ability, initiating a drag provokes an attack of opportunity from the target of your maneuver. If that attack of opportunity hits, you take damage as normal, but otherwise suffer no penalty on your Maneuver Offense for the drag attempt.
  • If your combat maneuver attack is successful, both you and your target are moved 5 feet back, with your opponent occupying your original space and you in the space behind that in a straight line.
  • For every 5 by which your attack exceeds your opponent's Maneuver Defense, you can drag the target back an additional 5 feet. You must be able to move with the target to perform this maneuver. If you do not have enough movement, the drag goes to the maximum amount of movement available to you and ends.
  • Drags are considered forced movement. An enemy being moved by a drag does not provoke an attack of opportunity because of the movement unless you possess the Greater Drag feat.
  • You cannot move a creature into a square that is occupied by a solid object or obstacle. If there is another creature in the way of your movement, the drag ends adjacent to that creature.
  • Stability Racial Trait: Some characters or types of creatures prove particularly sure-footed, making them more difficult to overthrow and move around the battlefield. Any racial ability that grants a bonus to Maneuver Defense versus bull rush attempts grants the same bonus against drag combat maneuvers.

Grapple

Type of Action: Standard action

  • A Grapple must be used against an adjacent foe or a foe within your natural reach. Increased reach from weapons does not extend this distance.
  • If you do not have Improved Grapple or a similar ability, attempting to grapple a foe provokes an attack of opportunity from the target creature. If that attack of opportunity hits, you take damage as normal, but otherwise suffer no penalty on your Maneuver Offense for the grapple attempt.
  • Humanoid creatures without two free hands attempting to grapple a foe take an additional -4 penalty on the combat maneuver roll. (Note that this penalty remains -4 even if both hands are holding something; the humanoid simply uses its arms and legs to wrap up the target creature.)
  • If your Grapple check equals or exceeds your target's Maneuver Defense, you inflict the Grabbed condition on your target.
  • If you beat your target's Maneuver Defense by 5 or more, the target is instead Grappled.
  • If you successfully grapple a creature that is not adjacent to you, move that creature to an adjacent open space (if no space is available, your grapple fails).
  • Once you have an opponent Grabbed, you can take actions as described in the Grabbed condition, which also describes how to escalate the condition to Grappled and Pinned.

Multiple Creatures:

  • Multiple creatures can use the Aid Another action to attempt to grapple one target, assisting one primary creature. Assisting creatures must be adjacent to (or able to reach via natural (non-weapon) reach) both the primary grappler and the target to be grappled. The primary grappler makes a Maneuver Offense check, with a +2 bonus for each creature that successfully assists in the grapple (using the Aid Another action).
  • Multiple creatures can also assist an allied creature in breaking free from a grapple, with each creature that assists (using the Aid Another action) granting a +2 bonus on the grappled creature's Maneuver Offense and/or Escape Artist checks to break free. Assisting creatures must be adjacent to (or able to reach via natural (non-weapon) reach) both the primary grappler and the target to be grappled.

Overrun

Type of Action: Standard Action, or during the movement portion of a Charge, or as Part of a Move Action (special; see below).

You attempt to overrun your target, passing through its square. If combined with the move action of a charge, this will allow you to 'charge through' an opponent if successful. If performed as a standard action, you move up to your speed as part of the maneuver.

  • Overrun does not require you to move in a straight line unless you combine it with a charge.
  • You must end your movement after an Overrun in an open space. If there is no open space past your opponent in which to end your movement, you cannot perform the maneuver.
  • You can only overrun an opponent who is no greater than one size category larger than you.
  • You can overrun multiple opponents if you have enough movement to do so. Lay out your desired path and determine how many foes you wish to overrun. Each of your overrun attempts takes a cumulative -3 penalty for each enemy after the first. Thus, if you wish to overrun one enemy, there is no penalty. Overrunning two enemies incurs a -3 penalty to both checks. Overrunning three enemies incurs a -6 penalty to all three checks.
  • If you do not have the Improved Overrun feat, or a similar ability, initiating an overrun provokes an attack of opportunity from each target of your maneuver. If the attack of opportunity hits, you take damage as normal, but otherwise suffer no penalty on your Maneuver Offense for the overrun attempt.
  • If your overrun attempt fails, you are stopped in the space directly in front of the opponent that you failed to overrun. If there are other creatures occupying that space, you are shunted back along your declared path to the first unoccupied space. If your overrun attempt was part of a charge action, you can only resolve the charge attack if you can still reach your intended charge target. If that target is out of reach, the charge attack is lost.
  • When you attempt to overrun a target, it can choose to avoid you, allowing you to pass through its square without requiring a maneuver offense check. If all of your overrun targets avoid you, you complete your movement, as though you had degraded your standard action to a move action. If you performed the overrun(s) as part of a charge, you resolve your charge attack against your target as normal.
  • If your target does not avoid you, make a combat maneuver (Maneuver Offense) check. If your maneuver is successful, you move through the target's space, inflicting your normal damage for a combat maneuver. If your target occupies more than one square, one overrun check will get you through its entire space, but you must have enough movement to make the whole trip. You only deal your combat maneuver damage to an overrun creature once, regardless of how many of its squares you pass through.
  • Special: You can perform an overrun maneuver as Part of a Move Action. However, when you do so, you may only perform it against a single creature. If successful, you can only pass through its space. You do not deal your combat maneuver damage to the creature, and you cannot knock the creature prone, no matter how much you exceed its Maneuver Defense. If the move-based overrun fails, it is resolved as described above.

Reposition

Type of Action: Standard action

A reposition attempts to force a foe to move to a different space in relation to your location. You do not move from your starting square during a reposition attempt.

  • Reposition attempts may be made against any creature you threaten.
  • You can only reposition an opponent that is no more than one size category larger than you.
  • If you do not have Reposition, Improved (Feat) or a similar ability, attempting to reposition a foe provokes an attack of opportunity from the target of your maneuver. If that attack of opportunity hits, you take damage as normal, but otherwise suffer no penalty on your Maneuver Offense for the reposition attempt.
  • If your combat maneuver attack is successful, you may move your target 5 feet to a new location within your reach. For every 5 by which your attack exceeds your opponent's Maneuver Defense, you can move the target an additional 5 feet.
  • The target must remain within your reach at all times during this movement, except for the final 5 feet of movement, which can be to a space adjacent to your reach.
  • Reposition is considered forced movement. You can use this maneuver to move a foe into a space that is intrinsically dangerous, such as off a cliff or into a wall of fire, but it may fall Prone to stop its forced movement in all cases. An enemy being moved by a reposition does not provoke an attack of opportunity for leaving threatened squares unless you possess the Greater Reposition feat.
  • You cannot move a creature into a square that is occupied by a solid object or obstacle.

Steal

Type of Action: Standard action

You attempt to take an item away from a foe. This maneuver can be used in melee to steal any item that is neither held nor hidden in a bag or pack.

  • You must have at least one hand free (holding nothing) to attempt this maneuver. The Steal attempt is made with that empty hand, and, unlike other combat maneuvers, Steal deals no damage unless you wish it to.
  • If you have a weapon with the Pilfering quality, you may make a Steal attempt with that hand as if it were empty. If your weapon has reach, you must still be adjacent to use Steal.
  • You must make a Steal attempt while adjacent to a target.
  • If you do not have Steal, Improved (Feat) or a similar ability, attempting to steal an object provokes an attack of opportunity from the target of your maneuver. If that attack of opportunity hits, you take damage as normal, but otherwise suffer no penalty on your Maneuver Offense for the steal attempt.
  • If your attack is successful, you may take one item from your opponent. You must be able to reach the item to be taken (subject to GM discretion).


Modifiers to the check:
  • Items that are loosely attached (such as items tucked into a belt, potions in a bandoleer, hats, brooches or necklaces) are the easiest to take, imposing no penalty.
  • Items fastened to a foe (such as cloaks, sheathed weapons, or pouches) are more difficult to take, and impose a -5 penalty to the check.
  • Items that are closely worn (such as armor, backpacks, boots, clothing, or rings) cannot be taken with this maneuver.
  • Items held in the hands (such as wielded weapons or wands) also cannot be taken with the steal maneuver-you must use the disarm combat maneuver instead. The GM is the final arbiter of what items can be taken.


Who can be stolen from:
  • Creatures that use natural attacks or have an intelligence of less than 6 frequently lack any items or equipment worth stealing.
  • Undead, creatures with weapons, or creatures with greater than animal intelligence are subject to the steal maneuver, even if the bestiary entry doesn't detail any specific items they possess.
  • If a monster uses a Steal maneuver against a player character, the monster chooses one of the character's visible items to target, determines whether it is "loosely attached" (no penalty), or "fastened" (-5 penalty), and makes his Maneuver Offense check against the player's Maneuver Defense. If successful, the creature steals that object from the player, and the player loses any benefits provided by that item until it is recovered.


Effects of stealing an item from a monster:
  • In cases where no items are defined for the creature, the Steal maneuver imposes a -2 penalty on the creature's armor class until the end of the encounter, or until it recovers its stolen item(s). This penalty applies to the creature's normal, touch and flat-footed AC's. In addition, a random amount of the creature's treasure value (1d10+4% of the creature's treasure value) is awarded immediately to the stealing character in the form of a small item, or piece of jewelry. (In a non-cutthroat party, this is only actually relevant if the creature escapes the combat and would otherwise not leave treasure behind.)
  • Generally speaking, a single creature with equipment (subject to Steal maneuvers) only has 1 "loosely attached" item, and 2 "closely worn" items, for a maximum AC penalty from the Steal maneuver of -6. This would require one successful Steal check at no penalty, and two successful steal checks at -5.


Recovering stolen items:
  • Stolen items can be recovered by rendering the stealing character helpless, unconscious, or dead, and then expending a move action to retrieve the items. Stolen items can also be recovered by attempting a Steal maneuver against the stealing character to try to recover the lost items. Once retrieved, the penalty to armor class (if applicable) immediately ends.

Sunder

Type of Action: An attack action in place of a melee attack. If you make a Sunder attempt at less than your full BAB, you still use your full Maneuver Defense for the Sunder attempt.

The Sunder combat maneuver can be used for two purposes: to attempt to sunder an item held or worn by an opponent, or to attempt to break or destroy an unattended object, fortification or structure.

A successful Sunder attempt inflicts 1 point of Siege Damage which is subtracted from an objects Durability score. Most wielded and common objects have a Durability score of 1, so a successful Sunder inflicts the Broken status immediately. Vehicles, fortifications, and very durable items such as armor and shields may have a higher Durability score.

To attempt to sunder an item held or worn by your opponent:

  • A Sunder must be made within the reach of the weapon used for the Sunder attempt. Note that unarmed attacks may sometimes also be used, and the reach requirement is the same.
  • If you do not have Sunder, Improved (Feat) or a similar ability, attempting to sunder an item provokes an attack of opportunity from the target of your maneuver. If that attack of opportunity hits, you take damage as normal, but otherwise suffer no penalty on your Maneuver Offense for the sunder attempt.
  • If your attack is successful, and removes all of the Durability of the item, the item you are sundering gains the Broken condition. Broken weapons inflict a -2 penalty to attack and damage rolls on the wielder until repaired, and broken armor inflicts a -2 penalty to the wearer's armor class. Wands and Staves which are broken require twice as many charges to activate their abilities. Any other item which is broken stops providing any benefit until repaired.
  • Only the actual items, armor, or weapons of creatures can be sundered. Natural armor, natural weapons and special abilities are not subject to Sunder attacks.
  • Where normally all items worn or wielded have a Durability of 1 (meaning they require only a single successful Sunder attempt to inflict the Broken condition), armor and shields are exceptions to this. Armor and shields have durability scores depending on the the type of armor and shields in question. Refer to the Sunders Against Armor and Sunders Against Shields entries for details.
  • A creature wielding a shield who is targeted with a Sunder combat maneuver may always elect to have its shield be the target of the sunder attempt, instead of the object being targeted, as long as the shield is not already Broken.


To attempt to sunder an unattended object, fortification or structure:

  • The sunder attempt is typically performed outside of combat, or as an attack by a Vehicle, Bogey, or Siege Weapon, though it can be done as part of an attack action in place of a melee attack, just like a Sunder against a worn or wielded item.
  • If the weapon you are wielding to perform the Sunder combat maneuver does not have the Sunder weapon quality, it cannot be used to sunder an object, structure or fortification made from, or reinforced with, metal or stone. Any weapon (even fists) can be used to make sunder attempts against softer objects, such as un-reinforced wood or glass, however.
  • The DC of the Sunder combat maneuver for most objects, structures and fortifications can be found on the Breaking Objects page.
  • Most unattended objects can be sundered with a single successful Sunder combat maneuver, but most structures and fortifications require multiple successful Sunder checks (this is denoted as the object's "Durability", listed on the Breaking Objects page).
  • For every 5 by which you beat the Sunder DC for the listed object, the amount of Siege Damage you inflict is increased by 1. For example, if a Reinforced Chest requires a Sunder DC of 22, and has a Durability of 4 points, and your Maneuver Offense check to sunder it is 37 or more, you break it with that one Sunder attempt (1 success for equaling the DC of 22, and another 3 successes for being 15 over the DC adds 3 points of Siege damage).
  • Once the Siege Damage inflicted equals or exceeds the object's listed Durability, the object becomes Broken.
  • Broken objects cease doing what they were designed to do. In the case of a broken chest, it is destroyed enough to allow its contents to be removed.
  • Broken structures, such as doors and gates, are broken enough to allow a character to pass through its shattered remains.
  • Broken fortifications, like walls or the ground, have been penetrated 5 feet in depth, such that a character may enter the square that was broken. In some cases, such as the ground, there's often more material behind that first 5 feet. This is how acts like tunneling under a wall (or smashing through a wall) can be performed.

Objects are rarely so destroyed that they cannot be repaired with magic or by the appropriate craftsman. Magic items can only be permanently destroyed via spells such as Mage's Disjunction (Spell), while mundane objects must be pretty thoroughly obliterated (as with Disintegrate (Spell)) before they are too destroyed to be repaired by Mending (Spell) (for non-magical items), or Make Whole (Spell) (for magical items). No amount of Sundering something can render it into a worse condition than Broken.

Sunders Against Armor

Armor is more difficult to Sunder than most worn or wielded objects, since its primary purpose is to protect the wearer. Armor has a durability score akin to unattended objects, meaning it has a number of points of Siege Points equal to its Durability score. As a result, it often requires more than one successful Sunder attempt to inflict the Broken condition upon the armor, and it is possible for extremely durable armors to even withstand hits from some smaller siege weapons.

  • Light armor has a durability of 2 (requires 2 points of Siege damage to inflict Broken)
  • Medium armor has a durability of 3 (requires 3 points of Siege Damage to inflict Broken)
  • Heavy armor has a durability of 4 (requires 4 points of Siege Damage to inflict Broken)
  • The durability of armor is increased by 1 if the armor is made entirely of metal.

Sunders Against Shields

Shields, like armor, are designed to protect the wearer, and are therefore more difficult to Sunder. Shields have a durability akin to unattended objects, requiring more than one successful Sunder attempt to inflict the Broken condition upon the shield. In addition, if an enemy attempts to sunder any of your worn or wielded items, and you are proficiently wielding a shield, you may ALWAYS elect to have that sunder check apply to your shield instead, as long as your shield does not already have the Broken condition.

  • Bucklers have a durability of 1 (requires only 1 point of Siege Damage to inflict Broken)
  • Light Shields have a durability of 2 (requires 2 points of Siege Damage to inflict Broken)
  • Heavy Shields have a durability of 3 (requires 3 points of Siege Damage to inflict Broken)
  • War Shields have a durability of 4 (requires 4 points of Siege Damage to inflict Broken)
  • Tower Shields have a durability of 5 (requires 5 points of Siege Damage to inflict Broken)
  • The durability of shields is increased by 1 if the shield is made of steel

Trip

Type of Action: An attack action, in place of an attack. If the attack action being used would not be at full BAB, your Maneuver Offense takes the same penalty. That is, if you replace your last attack in a full attack action to perform a trip, and your last attack in a full-attack action is at -10, then your Maneuver Offense roll is also at -10.

The trip combat maneuver can be used to attempt to knock a creature Prone.

  • You attempt a Trip against any foe you threaten.
  • You can only trip an opponent who is no more than one size category larger than you.

If you do not have Trip, Improved (Feat), or a similar ability, initiating a trip provokes an attack of opportunity from the target of your maneuver. If that attack of opportunity hits, you take damage as normal, but otherwise suffer no penalty on your Maneuver Offense for the trip attempt.

  • If your Trip combat maneuver attack exceeds the target's Maneuver Defense, the target is knocked Prone.
  • Some creatures, such as oozes, creatures without legs, and flying creatures, are immune to the Trip combat maneuver.