Glossary of Terms

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Let me look that up for you.

Contents

Below is a list of terms which are used frequently in Epic Path, or in d20-based role-playing games in general. This is meant as a quick reference guide for players new to Epic Path.

5-Foot Step

  • AKA:

Ability Damage

  • AKA:

Ability Drain

  • AKA:

Ability Score

  • AKA: Stat, Attribute

One of the six primary statistics defining a character's general attributes. These are Strength (STR), Dexterity (DEX), Constitution (CON), Intelligence (INT), Wisdom (WIS) and Charisma (CHA). Some campaigns feature one or more additional ability scores, though these are campaign specific. See also Ability Scores, Character Creation.

Ability Modifier

  • AKA: Stat Mod, Mod

The modifier produced by the ability score. This is calculated as (ability score - 10)/2 (round down). Thus, a score of 12 has a modifier of +1, while a score of 14 has a modifier of +2.

Action Points

  • AKA:

Activate Magic Item

  • AKA:

Many magic items don’t need to be activated. Certain magic items, however, do need to be activated, especially potions, scrolls, wands, rods, and staves. Unless otherwise noted, activating a magic item is a standard action.

Spell Completion Items

  • AKA:
Activating a spell completion item is the equivalent of casting a spell. It requires concentration and provokes attacks of opportunity. You lose the spell if your concentration is broken, and you can attempt to activate the item while on the defensive, as with casting a spell.

Spell Trigger, Command Word, or Use-Activated Items

  • AKA:
Activating any of these kinds of items is a standard action, but does not require concentration, nor does it provoke attacks of opportunity.

Afflictions

  • AKA:

Aid Another

  • AKA:

Alignment

  • AKA:

Ally

  • AKA: -

A member of your party, including yourself (unless specifically excluded), or a friendly NPC that is assisting you in a battle. Bystander NPC's who are not hostile, but are also not actively helping, are not considered allies.

Armor Class

  • AKA:

Assist

  • AKA:

At-Risk

  • AKA:

At-Will

  • AKA:

Attack Roll

  • AKA: To-Hit Roll

Aura

  • AKA:

An aura is an inherent emanation that is part of the possessor's being. Unless specifically described otherwise, an aura is always present and cannot be removed in any way by either the owner of the aura or the actions of others. Note that while an aura is always present, it may or may not apply effects on others, depending on how the possessor of the aura uses it.

An aura has the effects that are laid out in the aura's description at all times, and only ceases operation when the possessor of the aura is dead. However, an aura described as spell-like, supernatural, or gained as a spell effect, is subject to anti-magic effects. Conversely, an aura described as an Extraordinary ability is not subject to anti-magic.

An aura does not effect the owner of the aura unless stated explicitly in the description.

A creature can suppress or express the effects of their aura during their turn as a swift action.

An aura cannot harm a creature unless the owner of the aura has line of effect to the victim of the aura.

An aura's effect is always triggered by the owner of the aura. This trigger is a free action. An aura can trigger its effect in one of three ways, once per round:

  1. The aura may be triggered at the end of a move action. This allows the aura owner to move up to victims and affect them.
  2. The aura may be triggered at the beginning of a full round action or a standard action. This allows the aura's owner to incorporate the aura's effect into their attacks.
  3. The aura may be triggered by other events as described in the aura. This allows auras to activate upon the death of the owner, or when they use another talent, power or ability, or some other circumstance defined in the description.

If a victim has been affected by an aura once in a round, it is immune to any further applications of the aura's effect until the beginning of its next round.

The effects of an aura last until the end of the aura owner's next round unless they are instantaneous (damage) or otherwise removed earlier.

Auramancy

  • AKA:

Bailiwick Skill

  • AKA:

Base Attack Bonus

  • AKA: BAB

Each character class has a base attack bonus, which improves depending on your level in that class. This bonus is added to all to-hit rolls when calculating your attack bonus.

Base Land Speed

Bonus Types

Arcane Bonus

  • AKA: Arcane Charge
An Arcane Bonus comes from a spell which provides a bonus to one or more things (skills, to-hits, armor class, etc.) which was cast by an arcane caster, and lays a charge. Arcane Bonuses do not stack with other Arcane Bonuses, even if the two bonuses are attempting to boost totally different character attributes. If a new spell or effect attempts to apply a new Arcane Bonus on a character or creature which already has an existing Arcane Bonus, the subject must immediately choose to either keep their existing Arcane Bonus, or replace it with the new Arcane Bonus.
An Arcane Bonus does stack with a Divine Bonus (as well as any other bonus type, other than another Arcane Bonus), unless the effect being placed upon the target is coming from the same spell as the divine bonus. This means you can benefit from a buff spell cast by an arcane caster and a different buff spell cast by a divine caster at the same time, even if both spells improve the same attribute (such as armor class), unless both spells share the same name. (Note that 'same name' excludes the parenthetical in the page title, meaning that Stoneskin (Druid Spell) and Stoneskin (Sorcerer/Wizard Spell) are considered the same spell for this purpose.)

Armor Bonus

  • AKA:
An armor bonus is added to a character's Armor Class (AC), and stacks with other kinds of bonuses to AC, but not with other armor bonuses. If two different sources of armor bonus are available, only the highest available bonus may be used.

As the name implies, the most common source of an armor bonus happens when a character dons a suit of armor. A few other methods exist to gain an armor bonus, as well, such as spells, feats, etc. In all cases, if multiple sources of armor bonuses are available to a character, only the highest available bonus is used.

Armor Enhancement Bonus

  • AKA:
Magical enchantments can be applied to armor in two different forms: as an Armor Enhancement Bonus, or in the form of Armor Magic Properties.

If armor is enchanted with an enhancement bonus, the enhancement bonus is added directly to the armor's base armor bonus to AC, for purposes of determining the total AC provided by the armor. Thus, a +3 chain shirt, which has a base armor bonus to AC of 4, adds a total of 7 points to your armor class (counting the +3 enhancement bonus). The armor is still described as +3 armor (not +7 armor), since enhancement bonuses can only go up to +9, and the cost of the enhancement bonus is based on the plus provided. It is also a descriptive indicator of the armor's magical power.

An armor enhancement bonus stacks with other kinds of bonuses to AC, but not with other armor enhancement bonuses. If two different sources of armor enhancement bonus are available, only the highest available bonus may be used.

An armor enhancement bonus only provides a bonus to Armor Class. It has no effect on the armor's other attributes, such as Armor Check Penalty, Max Dex, etc.

Circumstance Bonus

  • AKA:
A circumstance bonus is a bonus that can be awarded by the GM to any action performed by a character or creature who has gained some advantage over their target, usually by being in the right place at the right time. As you can imagine, this covers a LOT of territory, but one of the most frequent sources of a circumstance bonus is a +1 bonus to-hit when attacking from a position of higher ground (note that the specific definition of what is, or isn't, higher ground is left up to the GM, and the attacking creature must still be able to reach their target, so the ground can't be TOO high...)
Other opportunities for circumstance bonuses can sometimes come from spells which alter your terrain, or the ability for a creature to perceive you (such as Invisibility (Sorcerer/Wizard Spell)). In such cases, it isn't really the spell that is providing the bonus, but the lingering effects of the spell. (When the spell causes the bonus directly, it's nearly always an Arcane Bonus or a Divine Bonus).
While some spells, feats, and skills may specifically grant a circumstance bonus when used appropriately, the GM is also free to issue circumstance bonuses (and, indeed, should do so), when the situation warrants it, and no other bonus is obviously available to use.
Unlike nearly all other bonus types, multiple circumstance bonuses to the same action are added together.

Competence Bonus

  • AKA:
A competence bonus can be granted by nearly anything, and can modify nearly any aspect of your character. Competence bonuses to the same element of your character do not stack with each other; instead, only the highest available bonus is used. You can have multiple competence bonuses, as long as they each apply to different elements of your character. Only where the same bonus type is being applied to the same element must you pick the highest available.

Divine Bonus

  • AKA: Divine Charge
An Divine bonus comes from a spell which provides a bonus to one or more things (skills, to-hits, armor class, etc.) which was cast by an divine caster, and lays a charge. Divine bonuses do not stack with other Divine Bonuses, even if the two bonuses are attempting to boost totally different character attributes. If a new spell or effect attempts to apply a new Divine Bonus on a character or creature which already has an existing Divine Bonus, the subject must immediately choose to either keep their existing Divine Bonus, or replace it with the new Divine Bonus.
A Divine Bonus does stack with an Arcane Bonus (as well as any other bonus type, other than another Divine Bonus), unless the effect being placed upon the target is coming from the same spell as the Arcane Bonus. This means you can benefit from a buff spell cast by an arcane caster and a different buff spell cast by a divine caster at the same time, even if both spells improve the same attribute (such as armor class), unless both spells share the same name. (Note that 'same name' excludes the parenthetical in the page title, meaning that Stoneskin (Druid Spell) and Stoneskin (Sorcerer/Wizard Spell) are considered the same spell for this purpose.)

Dodge Bonus

  • AKA:
A dodge bonus is a bonus applied to a character's Armor Class (AC). The most common source of a dodge bonus is feats, such as the appropriately-named Dodge (Feat), but also Mobility (Feat), and a variety of others. Other sources of dodge bonus include spells, class features, racial traits, etc. Unlike most other bonus types, Dodge bonuses stack with themselves. That is, if a character has more than one source of Dodge bonuses, each of them can be added to the character's armor class.

Dual Charge

  • AKA:
A dual charge occurs when a particularly powerful ongoing (non-instantaneous) effect, nearly always from a spell, but sometimes from a supernatural ability, is applied to a subject. When an effect lays a dual charge, it applies both an Arcane Bonus and a Divine Bonus to the target. Both of these bonus types are now in use, and should the same subject get affected by a new effect which would lay either an Arcane Bonus, a Divine Bonus, or a new Dual Charge, they must choose whether to keep their current effect, or replace it with the new one (even if the new one lays only an Arcane Bonus or a Divine Bonus). A creature may have both an Arcane Bonus and a Divine Bonus present on themselves simultaneously, but they can never have more than one Arcane Bonus, or more than one Divine Bonus present at the same time.

Enhancement Bonus

  • AKA:
An enhancement bonus is a bonus granted to a character by a magic item. Enhancement bonuses can be applied to almost any stat, skill, or score of a character, as the effects from magic items are diverse and powerful. Enhancement bonuses to the same element of the character do not stack, but enhancement bonuses to different elements can be applied simultaneously.
For example, you can have an item which grants an enhancement bonus of +4 to your Strength score, and a different item that grants a +2 enhancement bonus to your Survival skill checks. Both of these bonuses apply, since they are affecting different elements of the character. However, two items which both grant an enhancement bonus to a character's Strength score would not stack; instead, only the highest available bonus would be applied.

Feat Bonus

  • AKA:
A feat bonus is a bonus type that can be applied to nearly any number on your character sheet, from ability scores, to skill checks, to saving throws. Feat bonuses, as the name suggests, always come from feats. Feat bonuses do not stack with themselves; instead, only the highest available feat bonus is applied to a given particular skill. You can have multiple feat bonuses, as long as they each apply to different elements of your character. Only where the same bonus type is being applied to the same element must you pick the highest available.

Implement Bonus

  • AKA:
Only Bards, Clerics, Druids, Sorcerers, and Wizards receive an implement bonus.
Beginning at 1st level, while wielding a rod, staff, or wand, you gain an implement bonus to all to-hit rolls you make when casting a spell or activating a spell-like ability. This bonus applies to melee touch attacks, ranged touch attacks, standard melee attacks, or standard ranged attacks. Divine casters may also use their holy symbol as an implement.

The implement bonus is equal to +1 at 1st level, and increases by an additional +1 per 4 class levels, dropping fractions, to a maximum of +9 at level 33 (i.e. +2 at 5th, +3 at 9th, +4 at 13th, +5 at 17th, +6 at 21st, +7 at 25th, +8 at 29th, and +9 at 33rd). Note that, if you multi-class into another class that also gets this bonus, the class levels stack for purposes of calculating this bonus.

If you are not actively wielding a rod, staff, or wand, you do not get this bonus.

Furthermore, casters can flick, twirl, or swoosh a wielded rod, staff, or wand to complete the somatic gestures of any spells they cast, in place of using their empty hand(s). That is, an implement counts as an empty hand for purposes of completing somatic gestures.

When wielding a magic staff in both hands, a caster need only have material components in a readily available storage location (like a Component Pouch). The staff will draw out and consume the components as part of casting the spell, eliminating the need for the caster to pause in wielding the staff to draw the component themselves. This only works if the component is in an accessible place that could normally be pulled from as part of casting a spell. If the component is tucked away in a (non-magical) backpack, stored in a portable hole, or left in the caster's bedside table back in town, the staff has no power to pull components from there.

Luck Bonus

  • AKA:

Martial Bonus

  • AKA:

Material Bonus

  • AKA:

A material bonus is granted by a dweomermetal, either when it is applied to a weapon, an armor, or a shield. Material bonuses do not stack with themselves, when applied to the same number (i.e. two material bonuses to your Will saving throw would not stack, but a material bonus to your Will save and your Reflex save are both counted, even if they are from separate sources).

Morale Bonus

  • AKA:

Natural Armor

  • AKA:

Resistance Bonus

  • AKA:

Shield Bonus

  • AKA:
Disambiguation: Deflection Bonus does not exist in Epic Path. Shield Bonus and Shield Enhancement Bonus take its place.

A shield bonus is added to a character's Armor Class (AC), and stacks with other kinds of bonuses to AC, but not with other shield bonuses. If two different sources of shield bonus are available, only the highest available bonus may be used.

As the name implies, the most common source of a shield bonus happens when a character wields a shield. However, some weapons grant a shield bonus (such as the Scizore, and the Glaive) when used (or not used) in a particular way. A few other methods exist to gain a shield bonus, as well, such as spells, feats, etc. In all cases, if multiple sources of shield bonuses are available to a character, only the highest available bonus is used.

Shield Enhancement Bonus

  • AKA:
Magical enchantments can be applied to shields in two different forms: as a Shield Enhancement Bonus, or in the form of Shield Magic Properties.

If a shield is enchanted with an enhancement bonus, the enhancement bonus is added directly to the shield's base shield bonus to AC, for purposes of determining the total AC provided by the shield. Thus, a +3 heavy steel shield, which has a base shield bonus to AC of 2, adds a total of 5 points to your armor class (counting the +3 enhancement bonus). The shield is still described as a +3 shield (not a +5 shield), since enhancement bonuses can only go up to +9, and the cost of the enhancement bonus is based on the plus provided. It is also a descriptive indicator of the shield's magical power.

A shield enhancement bonus stacks with other kinds of bonuses to AC, but not with other shield enhancement bonuses. If two different sources of shield enhancement bonus are available, only the highest available bonus may be used.

A Shield Enhancement Bonus only provides a bonus to Armor Class. It has no effect on the shield's other attributes, such as Armor Check Penalty, Max Dex, etc.

Training Bonus

  • AKA:
A training bonus is a bonus type applied to a skill check. Training bonuses typically come from either a class feature or a racial trait. Training bonuses do not stack with themselves; instead, only the highest available training bonus is applied to a given particular skill. You can have multiple training bonuses, as long as they each apply to different skills. Only where the same bonus type is being applied to the same skill must you pick the highest available.
Training bonuses can also sometimes apply only to a single skill use within a given skill. A common example of this is Initiative, which is a skill use of the Movement skill. Just be aware that these bonuses still do not stack. The highest bonus available is used where ever it is applicable, but the bonuses are NEVER added together.

Weapon Bonus

  • AKA:

Campaign Level

  • AKA:

Caster Check

  • AKA:

Caster Level

  • AKA:

Challenge Rating

  • AKA: CR
Challenge Rating (or CR) is a convenient number used to indicate the relative danger presented by a monster, trap, hazard, or other encounter—the higher the CR, the more dangerous the encounter. Refer to Table: Encounter Design to determine the Challenge Rating your group should face, depending on the difficulty of the challenge you want and the group’s APL.

Character Level

  • AKA: Class Level, Level

Combat Casting

  • AKA:

Combat Maneuver

  • AKA:

Command Word

  • AKA: Command, On Command

Common Energy Damage

  • AKA:

(Fire, Sonic, Electric, Acid, Negative (etc?))

Concentration

  • AKA:

Critical Hit

  • AKA:

Critical Multiplier

  • AKA:

Critical Range

  • AKA:

Critical Threat

  • AKA:

Damage Resistance

Damage Roll

  • AKA:

Defenseless

  • AKA:

A creature which is defenseless against something takes double damage from it.

Dice

  • AKA:

Difficult Terrain

  • AKA:

Difficulty Class

  • AKA: DC

Dweomermetals

  • AKA:

Encounter

  • AKA: Combat

Enemy

  • AKA: Opponent, Target

Energy Resistance

  • AKA: ER

Exotic Energy Damage

  • AKA:

(Light / Dark, Force / Void, Psychic / Organic, Daylight / Moonlight -and/or-, Solar / Lunar)

Experience Points

  • AKA:

Extraordinary Ability

  • AKA: Ex
An Extraordinary Ability is an unusual ability that does not rely on magic to function, relying on a creature's own innate power to activate it. They are not something that just anyone can do or even learn to do without extensive training. They can produce a wide variety of effects, though perhaps not so wide as those effects possible with spells, spell-like abilities, or supernatural abilities. They can be passive, always-on, type of effects, or activated with an action of some kind. They can produce an instant benefit, or have an ongoing effect. Refer to the ability's description for details.

Extraordinary abilities are non-magical in nature, and as such are not affected by, and continue to operate, in the absence of magic, such as from an Antimagic Field (Sorcerer/Wizard Spell). Similarly, Spell Resistance (SR) provides no defense against them. Finally, unless specifically stated otherwise in the ability's description, activating an extraordinary ability does not provoke attacks of opportunity from threatening enemies.

Fear Effect

  • AKA: [fear]

Feat

  • AKA:

Fighting Defensively

  • AKA:

Fluency

  • AKA:

Forced Movement

  • AKA: Push, Pull, Slide

Full Attack Action

  • AKA:

Full Day

  • AKA:

Full-Round Action

  • AKA:

Game Master

  • AKA: GM

Gaze

  • AKA:

A gaze special attack takes effect when foes look at the attacking creature. The attack can have any sort of effect, see each writeup for details. While the gaze attack power is active, each opponent within the range of that gaze attack must attempt a saving throw each round at the beginning of his or her turn in the initiative order. Only looking directly at a creature with a gaze attack leaves an opponent vulnerable. Opponents can avoid the need to make the saving throw by not looking at the creature, in one of two ways.

Averting Eyes: The opponent avoids looking directly at the creature, instead looking at it out of the corner of the eyes in fleeting glimpses, watching its shadow, tracking it in a reflective surface, etc. Each round, the opponent has a 50% chance to avoid having to make a saving throw against the gaze attack. The creature with the gaze attack, however, gains partial concealment (20 percent miss chance) against that opponent.
Wearing a Blindfold: The foe cannot see the creature at all (also possible to achieve by turning one's back on the creature or shutting one's eyes). The creature with the gaze attack gains total concealment (50 percent miss chance) against the opponent.

A creature with a gaze attack activates the power as described in the ability.

Since they are based on vision, gaze attacks can affect creatures with line of sight but not line of effect, even including beings that are ethereal, Cloistered, Displaced, or Exiled. The creature with the gaze attack does not need to know an enemy is near: the saving throw is based upon the actions of the enemy creatures, not the actions of the creature with the gaze attack.

A creature is immune to gaze attacks of others of its kind unless otherwise noted. Allies of a creature with a gaze attack might be affected. All the creature's allies are usually considered to be averting their eyes from the creature with the gaze attack, and have a 50% chance to not need to make a saving throw against the gaze attack each round.

Hardened

  • AKA:

A creature which is hardened against something takes half damage from it. Many creatures are only hardened against precision damage, for example, rather than being completely immune to it (e.g. oozes, incorporeal creatures, elementals, etc.).

Hit Dice

  • AKA:

Hit Points

  • AKA:

Holding an Action

  • AKA:

Illumination

Immediate Action

  • AKA:

Immunity

  • AKA:

A creature which is immune to something takes no damage from it. (See also: Hardened) Creatures with no discernible anatomy are often immune to flanking, for example.

Few creatures should ever be immune to precision damage (unless that is their schtick), since it essentially takes several classes out of the fight entirely. Similarly, immunity to magic should probably be represented by Spell Resistance instead of immunity.

Improvised Weapon

  • AKA:

Initiative

  • AKA:

Instantaneous Healing

  • AKA:

Language-Dependent

  • AKA: [language-dependent]

Lay Magic

  • AKA:

Lays a Charge

  • AKA:
Spell effects, and occasionally supernatural abilities, can sometimes lay a charge, either on their target, or on the caster who cast the spell or used the ability. When something lays a charge, it either affects the subject with an Arcane Bonus, a Divine Bonus, or a Dual Charge bonus. The term lays a charge refers to the fact that one of these bonus types is now in use by the subject, usually because they were the recipient of some buff effect. As a result, subsequent effects that would apply the same bonus type will not stack, even if they are attempting to adjust totally different character attributes. As soon as a new charge is placed upon your character of the same type as an existing charge, you must immediately either choose to replace your existing charge with the new one, or keep your existing charge.
Effects that lay a charge don't work the same way as normal bonus type stacking. Normal bonus types can't be stacked with themselves, but only if they're trying to affect the same character attribute (for example, you can't add together two different enhancement bonuses that improve your armor class; you can only have one enhancement bonus affecting a given character attribute). You can have two enhancement bonuses, as long as they are being applied to different attributes (i.e. one is boosting AC, and one is boosting to-hits).
When a spell or ability lays an Arcane Bonus (for example), you cannot get a second Arcane Bonus applied to you for any reason, even if both charges affect totally different attributes. You can only have one, regardless of which attributes they are affecting. The same is true of Divine Bonuses. However, you can have an Arcane Bonus and a Divine Bonus present at the same time, even if they are both affecting the same character attribute. The exception to this rule is you cannot get two versions of the same buff spell (i.e. that share the same spell name, like Stoneskin (Druid Spell) (which lays a divine bonus) and Stoneskin (Sorcerer/Wizard Spell) (which lays an arcane bonus); these cannot be stacked, even though they lay different bonus types).
A Dual Charge overwrites both the Arcane Bonus and the Divine Bonus at the same time, assuming you accept it, meaning if you have an effect on you which lays a Dual Charge, you may not accept any effects which Lay and Arcane, Divine, or Dual Charge, unless you overwrite your existing Dual Charge effect.

Line of Effect

  • AKA:

Line of Sight

  • AKA:

Linked Skills

  • AKA:

Maneuver Offense

  • AKA:

Maneuver Defense

  • AKA:

Melee Attack

  • AKA:

Melee Touch Attack

  • AKA:

Metagaming

  • AKA:

Mind Affecting

  • AKA: [mind affecting]

Mindless

  • AKA:

Minute

  • AKA:

Monster Blueprint

  • AKA:

Monster Lore

  • AKA:

Monster Pattern

  • AKA: Monster Template

Monster Role

  • AKA:

Monster Subtypes

  • Air
  • Chaotic
  • Demon
  • Devil
  • Earth
  • Elemental
  • Evil
  • Fire
  • Good
  • Incorporeal
  • Lawful
  • Native
  • Water

Monster Type

  • AKA:

Aberration

Animal

Construct

Dragon

Fey

Humanoid

Magical Beast

Monstrous Humanoid

Ooze

Outsider

Plant

Protean

Swarm

Troop

Undead

Vermin

Move Action

  • AKA:

Multiplier

  • AKA:

Natural 1

  • AKA:

Natural 20

  • AKA:

Natural Attack

  • AKA:

Many creatures use natural attacks instead of weapons during combat, relying on their teeth, claws, and other parts of their own body to inflict harm on their foes without the use of weapons or magic. Such monster attacks are defined in their Monster blueprint, and will have the unique effects described for each monster. If a player character is granted a natural attack by an ability, spell, or other effect, it is resolved as an unarmed strike unless otherwise defined, and does not normally provoke an attack of opportunity.

Natural Talent

  • AKA:

Non-Lethal Damage

  • AKA:

Non-Player Character

  • AKA: NPC

Non-Proficiency

  • AKA:

Ongoing Damage

  • AKA: Recurring Damage, Bleeds, Ruptures

Persistent Healing

  • AKA: Ongoing Healing

Physical Damage

  • AKA:

Precision Damage

  • AKA:

Primal Damage

  • AKA:

irresistible energy damage

Primary Attack

  • AKA:

Racial Traits

  • AKA:

Ranged Attack

  • AKA:

Ranged Touch Attack

  • AKA:

Ray

  • AKA:

Readying an Action

  • AKA:

Rest

  • AKA:

Retraining

  • AKA:

Round

  • AKA:

Rounding

  • AKA:

Saving Throw

  • AKA: Save, Fort Save, Reflex Save, Will Save

When a creature is the subject of a dangerous spell or effect, it often receives a saving throw to mitigate the damage or result. Saving throws are passive, meaning that a character does not need to take an action to make a saving throw—they are made automatically. There are three types of saving throws: Fortitude (used to resist poisons, diseases, and other bodily ailments), Reflex (used to avoid effects that target an entire area, such as fireball), and Will (used to resist mental attacks and spells).

Saving throws are also sometimes just referred to as saves, as in “What is your Reflex Save?“.

Secondary Attack

  • AKA:

Secret Languages

  • AKA:

Size

  • AKA:

Skill Basis

  • AKA:

Skill Bonus

  • AKA: Skill Total, Total Bonus

Skill Ranks

  • AKA:

Spell

  • AKA:

Spell-Like Ability

  • AKA: Sp

Spell-like abilities are magical abilities that work much like spells, except that they are not spells and so have no verbal, somatic, focus, or material components). They can replicate nearly any effect that a spell could produce, and typically require a standard action to activate. Refer to the ability's description for details.

Spell-like abilities, like spells, immediately end when in an area without magic, such as an Antimagic Field (Sorcerer/Wizard Spell), and cannot be reactivated until the non-magical area is left, or the effect preventing magic is ended. Spell-like abilities are subject to Spell Resistance (SR), unless specifically noted otherwise in the ability's description. Just like spells, spell-like abilities provoke attacks of opportunity from threatening enemies unless the creature activating it makes a caster check to cast defensively (DC 10 + (spell level x 4)).

Monsters with spell-like abilities are considered to be spell casters outside of combat, able to cast nearly any spell appropriate to their CR that the GM feels the creature might know. Inside of combat, monsters rely solely on their listed spell-like abilities to produce the equivalent of spell effects. That is, even though they may know a wide variety of spells that they can use outside of combat, they can only use the spell-like abilities listed in their special abilities section during combat. Monster spell-like abilities always list the caster check information at the beginning of the ability's description, including the target DC of the check.

Stabilize

  • AKA:

Stacking

  • AKA:

Stance

  • AKA:

Standard Action

  • AKA:

Status Condition

  • AKA:

Status Condition Array

  • AKA:

Supernatural Ability

  • AKA: Su

Supernatural abilities are special abilities which rely on a magical component to operate, but they are not 'cast' like a spell, or spell-like ability. Supernatural abilities can vary wildly in effect, providing offensive, defensive, and/or utilitarian capabilities. They can be passive, always-on, type effects, or triggered by an action. They can have an instantaneous effect, or a sustained effect. Refer to the special ability's description for details.

Unlike spells and spell-like abilities, Supernatural abilities do not provoke attacks of opportunity from threatening creatures when activated, and they are not subject to spell resistance. However, Supernatural abilities cannot be activated or maintained in areas lacking magic, such as an Antimagic Field (Sorcerer/Wizard Spell). In such an area, the ability immediately ends, and is not able to be reactivated until the creature leaves the non-magical area, or the effect preventing magic is ended.

Swift Action

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Take 10

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Take 20

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Temporary hit points

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Thrown Weapon

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Total Defense

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Touch Attack

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Total Party Kill

  • AKA: TPK, Wipe

Turn

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Trained Skills

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True Dweomers

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Uncommon Energy Damage

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(Cold, Quiescence (stifling, silence, stilling) Stilling, Inertia (enverating?) Stasis, Dessicating, Positive)

Vulnerable

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A creature which is vulnerable to something takes 1.5x damage from it. For example, many undead are vulnerable to positive energy. Fey are nearly always vulnerable to cold iron. (See also: Defenseless.)