Wizard

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Bah, adventures are such a bother....

Wizards are scholars in the study of magic. They spend their days meticulously experimenting with every nuance of every symbol of every spell, and carefully documenting the results. Their spellbooks are elaborate collections of notes on every gesture, auric twist, material component, and verbal utterance required to cast a spell as efficiently and potently as possible. While wizards are highly valued as members of adventuring parties, most greatly prefer to spend their days in study, perfecting their art. While the more bold among the wizarding community recognize that adventuring, fighting monsters, defeating traps, and exploring ancient ruins are all valuable ways to gain practical experience casting spells (and measuring their effects against real subjects, rather than theoretical), they also recognize that studying arcane lore and measuring the waveforms of the perturbations in their auras as they cast a spell can be just as valuable an experience.

Wizards are no mere finger-wagglers, nor do they rely on luck and moxie to achieve the miracles they perform with magic. They are experts in the arcane, with a near-religious fervor for learning everything they can about how magic interacts with (or perhaps constructs) the world around them. Most wizards spend years in apprenticeship to a more senior wizard before they can even cast their first spell, learning the theory behind why magic works, and why it can manifest tangible results in the material plane. Becoming a wizard is a deep commitment to learning, study, and observation. Indeed, most wizards have more in common with alchemists than they do with sorcerers, since alchemists are dedicated to a scientific method of discovery, while sorcerers are simply able to manipulate magic through some convenient happenstance within their ancestry.

In keeping with their endless pursuit of knowledge, wizards frequently accumulate huge quantities of spells. Every new spell the wizard gets access to is an exciting opportunity to grow their understanding of Magic. That the new spell might give them some new ability or make them somehow stronger in or out of combat is entirely a secondary concern. Learning more is always better than getting more powerful. Power will always come out of knowledge, but the opposite is rarely true.

And this leads us to the true reason that many wizards seek out adventures: getting access to new sources of knowledge is often quite expensive. And if surrounding themselves with burly, sweaty folks who have more courage than sense can give them a means of acquiring wealth, and they can exchange that wealth for more knowledge, then that is a price many are willing to pay. As long as they can also take some time off every now and again to study.

Role:

Wizards are, perhaps, the most adaptable and useful of any of the character classes. Wizards frequently have a huge repertoire of spells, allowing them to prepare a custom set of tools for nearly any circumstance they might face. Wizards can buff their party (and themselves), throw damaging or disabling spells at hostile enemies, alter the battlefield, call upon extraplanar forces to assist them, and perform a whole plethora of other feats that could only be achieved with magic. Furthermore, because they are so intelligent, most wizards are also highly skilled in a variety of practical and technical skills. Wizards are often experts in lore, studying history and geography with an aplomb rarely encountered among other adventuring types. Wizards can call upon deadly magic to destroy their enemies, and such feats are quite impressive, but the wizard's greatest contribution to a party tends to be in all the many other things they can do besides dealing incredible damage in a fight.

Alignment: Any

Hit Die: d4

Starting Wealth: 250 gp

Recommended Ability Score Priority:
  • Intelligence: primary; used for spells.
  • Dexterity: secondary; useful for ranged attacks, ranged touch attacks, AC, and reflex saves.
  • Constitution: low priority.
  • Charisma: low priority.
  • Wisdom: low priority.
  • Strength: low priority; You are no beast of burden! Let someone less educated carry all your stuff.
Base To-Hit:
A wizard's base to-hit numbers are calculated normally. They do not receive any bonus ability modifiers to their melee or ranged to-hit rolls.
  • Melee To-Hit: Base Attack Bonus (BAB) + Strength Modifier
  • Ranged To-Hit: Base Attack Bonus (BAB) + Dexterity Modifier
Base Weapon Damage:
A wizard's base weapon damage numbers are calculated normally. They do not receive any bonus ability modifiers to their melee or ranged damage rolls.
  • Melee Damage: Base Weapon Damage + Strength Modifier
  • Thrown Weapon Damage: Base Weapon Damage + Strength Modifier
  • Projectile Weapon Damage: Base Weapon Damage (may add Strength Modifier only if the weapon has the Mighty quality)
Base Armor Class:
A wizard's base armor class is 9.
  • Armor Class: 9 + Armor bonus + Adjusted Dexterity Modifier + Shield Bonus (if any) + Racial Size Modifier (if any)
Maneuver Defense:
A wizard's maneuver defense is calculated normally.
  • Maneuver Defense: 10 + ½ Character Level (round down) + Strength Modifier + Dexterity Modifier + Shield Bonus (if any) + Size Modifier
Skills:
Wizards get 3 + Int modifier skill ranks per Wizard class level.
Your bailiwick skill is always considered a Natural Talent skill, which means you can choose which of your ability modifiers are mapped to it. Furthermore, Natural Talent skills never suffer from an Armor Check Penalty, even if you map them to Strength or Dexterity.
You automatically gain skill ranks in your linked skill equal to the number of ranks you place in your Bailiwick skill. Remember that you can never place more skill ranks into a skill than your character level. Your Linked skill, as a Knowledge skill, is always mapped to your Intelligence modifier unless you choose it as your Natural Talent skill.
  • Natural Talent:
You may choose one skill (in addition to your Bailiwick skill) to be a Natural Talent at 1st level, which means you can choose which of your ability modifiers are mapped to it. Furthermore, Natural Talent skills never suffer from an Armor Check Penalty, even if you map them to Strength or Dexterity.
All characters receive an additional natural talent skill at character (not class) levels 11, 21, and 31. Additional natural talents may also be gained through Self-Improvement. Because natural talents are gained at particular character levels, dual-classed and multi-classed characters receive the same number of natural talent skills (and at the same levels) as a single-classed character.
  • Suggested Skills:
The following skills may be somewhat more applicable or useful to this class than others. This list is by no means intended to limit which skills you choose for your character. Unless a particular skill has a note stating that it is important for this class, your character will likely function just fine without any of these skills. If you have a vision for how your character should be, follow that, instead. These are just suggestions.
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Favored Class: Wizard

If the Wizard class is your Favored Class, you gain the following benefits at level 1. This is in addition to those benefits and class features listed for level 1 in the Class Progression: Wizard table, below.

Level To-Hit Fort Ref Will Base AC Favored Class Feature
BAB Full Attack
Fav +0 2 attacks +0 +0 +2 9 Specialist

Specialist (Ex)

If wizard is your favored class, you gain the Spell Focus feat, specializing in your chosen Arcane School, as a bonus feat at 1st level. This feat increases the Save DC (if any) of all spells belonging to your chosen Arcane School, making it more difficult for your foes to resist their effects.

This bonus does not apply to any of the spells the wizard knows from the schools of magic that are complementary to the wizard's chosen Arcane School, nor does it apply to any spells from the Universal school.

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Courageous Wizard (Levels 1 - 5)

Level Full Attack BAB Saving Throws Base AC Class Features
1st Atk 2nd Atk 3rd Atk 4th Atk Fort Refl Will
1st   +0   -5   -   -   +0   +0   +2   9 Level 1 Spells, Arcane School, Implement Bonus, Powerful Cantrip I
2nd   +1 (+1)   -4 (+1)   -   -   +0   +0   +3 (+1)   9 Bonus Feat I
3rd   +1   -4   -   -   +1 (+1)   +1 (+1)   +3   9 Level 2 Spells,
4th   +2 (+1)   -3 (+1)   -   -   +1   +1   +4 (+1)   9 Arcane Familiar
5th   +2   -3   -   -   +1   +1   +4   9 Level 3 Spells

Weapon and Armor Proficiency

Wizards are proficient with the Athame, Dagger, Light Crossbow, Heavy Crossbows, Light Mace, Sickle, and Mage's Staff, but not with any type of armor or shield.

Arcane Spells and Armor

Even the lightest of armors can interfere with the complicated gestures required while casting any spell that has a somatic component. The armor and shield descriptions list the arcane spell failure chance for different armors and shields.

If a spell doesn't have a somatic component, an arcane spellcaster can cast it with no arcane spell failure chance while wearing armor. Such spells can also be cast even if the caster's hands are bound or they are grappling (although Concentration checks may still be necessary). The metamagic feat Still Spell allows a spellcaster to prepare or cast a spell without the somatic component at one spell level higher than normal. This also provides a way to cast a spell while wearing armor without risking arcane spell failure.

Wizard Spells (Sp)

  • Wizards are Intelligence-Based Arcane casters, that must prepare their spells in advance.

Beginning at 1st level, a wizard is able to cast arcane spells drawn from the Wizard Spells list. A wizard must choose and prepare his spells ahead of time, and cannot choose a different spell 'at will'. A wizard must carefully plan what spells they memorize, with an eye to some general utility spells (often damaging or transport or buff spells) and some spells that they anticipate will be useful for the planned adventures. Frequently, wizards will find themselves without the right spell, which means they need to improvise, or wait until the next day to perform some task.

The seven schools of arcane magic.

Arcane School

A wizard must choose to specialize in one school of magic, focusing their profound intellect upon the mastery of a particular subset of arcane spells. This choice must be made when the character first gains any levels in the Wizard class, and once made, it cannot be changed, except through the re-selection process. (Note that, if the reselection process is used to change schools, any spells learned from schools that would become opposition schools under the new choice are lost. The wizard can replace up to one lost spell per wizard level they possess with a new spell of the same spell level as the one being lost, choosing from a school they now have access to. If the wizard loses more spells than the "one per wizard level" would replace, the extra spells are simply lost without replacement. Changes of this magnitude have consequences, and should not be undertaken without due consideration.)

Once chosen, the wizard may only learn, prepare, and cast spells from that specific school, from the two schools complementary to that school, and from the Universal school. Consequently, they may never learn spells from the four schools of magic that are in opposition to their chosen arcane school. Wizards receive no bonuses or penalties for casting spells from their primary school, complementary schools, or the Universal school. They are all cast with the same precision and ability as those from the primary school.

The seven arcane schools are Abjuration, Transmutation, Conjuration, Evocation, Illusion, Enchantment, and Necromancy. Each school offers a host of offensive, defensive, and utility spells to the wizard that chooses them; do not assume that only the evocation school has damaging spells, for example. All of the schools include spells that can harm enemies, but each school also offers a variety of unique spells that are not available in the other schools.

Primary School Complementary Schools Opposition Schools (Restricted)
Abjuration Necromancy, Transmutation, Universal Conjuration, Evocation, Illusion, Enchantment
Transmutation Abjuration, Conjuration, Universal Evocation, Illusion, Enchantment, Necromancy
Conjuration Transmutation, Evocation, Universal Illusion, Enchantment, Necromancy, Abjuration
Evocation Conjuration, Illusion, Universal Enchantment, Necromancy, Abjuration, Transmutation
Illusion Evocation, Enchantment, Universal Necromancy, Abjuration, Transmutation, Conjuration
Enchantment Illusion, Necromancy, Universal Abjuration, Transmutation, Conjuration, Evocation
Necromancy Enchantment, Abjuration, Universal Transmutation, Conjuration, Evocation, Illusion

Spells Known

A wizard records all of the spells they know in one or more spellbooks. Each wizard's spellbook is unique, and contains notes (often in a shorthand only that wizard truly understands) on every gesture, nuance, incantation, intonation, and cadence required to successfully cast the spell. While there is a near-scientific precision to the proper casting of a spell, wizards spend tremendous time and effort seeking small advantages, slight alterations to the standard way a spell is cast that grant some smidgen of extra efficiency or potency. Such discoveries are tightly held secrets, and rarely shared with other wizards (and any non-wizard would find such nuances to be entirely meaningless, since they lack the foundation of arcane studies to even comprehend the cleverness of the discovery).

A wizard begins play with a spellbook containing all 0-level wizard spells available to them, based on the arcane school they have chosen (i.e. all 0th-level spells from their primary school, their two complementary schools, and from the Universal school). In addition, the wizard may begin play knowing a number of 1st-level spells equal to 3 + their Intelligence Modifier. These 1st level spells must also be chosen from among those spells available to them, based on their chosen arcane school.

Each time a character attains a new wizard level, they learn two more spells of their choice to add to their spellbook. The two free spells must be of spell levels they can cast. At least one of the two free spells learned must come from the wizard's chosen primary arcane school.

Wizards cannot typically 'unlearn' a spell, once it is known (and knowing more spells is generally a very good thing for a wizard, even if a particular spell isn't especially useful to them). However, with GM's approval, a wizard can trade out up to one spell for free for another spell of equal spell level from a school they are allowed to learn, up to once per new wizard level gained.

There is no limit to how many spells a wizard can learn from within those Arcane Schools available to them, as long as they have space to record them in one of their spellbooks and spend the time and resources to inscribe them into the book. While a wizard can acquire new spells simply by purchasing a scroll of the appropriate spell, they must inscribe it into their spellbook before they actually know that spell. The process of inscribing the spell is what personalizes it and makes it something that wizard can cast on a repeatable basis. Even if a wizard comes across another wizard's spellbook, they must inscribe any new spells into their own spellbook before they learn any of the new spells it might contain; until that process is done, the 'found' spellbook is no better to the wizard than a stack of scrolls. Attempting to cast a spell from another wizard's spellbook destroys that spell exactly the way a scroll is destroyed when read. (This is a primary reason why wizards never share their spellbooks with anyone. An accidental casting can destroy their hard-earned knowledge forever.)

Spells Preparable Per Day

While a wizard may have access a huge variety of spells, they must select only a few of them to prepare each day, and may only cast those spells that they have prepared. If they want to cast a spell more than once, they must prepare it more than once.

Preparing a spell is done by studying the wizard's spellbook each day. While it may seem non-intuitive for a wizard to have to repeat this process each day even when preparing the same spell(s) over and over again, the reason for it is tied to how magic interacts with people. In order to prepare a spell, a wizard ties the elements of that spell into their aura, weaving it among the threads in a complex pseudo-knot that becomes quickly untied when the wizard casts the spell. Once the spell it cast, it is no longer bound to the wizard's aura. Their aura, twisted and stretched from containing the spell's form, takes some time to 'snap back' to the wizard's normal auric configuration; typically, this occurs over the course of a full night's rest. In order to cast the spell again, the wizard must once more bind the shape of that spell into their aura. While many wizards can likely memorize exactly how this is done, thereby doing away with their spellbooks, such things are never done. Each time the wizard twists a spell into their aura, they are learning new things about that spell, and about their own aura. These tidbits of knowledge are carefully recorded in their spellbook, and might eventually lead to improvements on the spell.

Once a spell is attached to the wizard's aura, the spell can be cast. The exact actions required to to this vary by spell, but it is typically a standard action to release the spell from their aura and cause its effects to manifest upon the world. As a wizard grows in power and level, their auras become stronger, their understanding of the fundamental forces of magic improves, and thus the wizard gains access to higher level spells, and the ability to prepare and cast more of them each day.

To prepare or cast a spell, a wizard must have an Intelligence score equal to at least 10 + the spell level.

Once a spell is cast, it is released from the wizard's aura, and is not available to cast again, unless they prepared that same spell more than once. As each spell is cast, the wizard's retinue of spells they have prepared for that day is used up.

In order to restore their capacity to cast spells each day, the wizard must spend an hour of their full night's rest studying their spellbooks and memorizing their new spells for the coming day. It is assumed that this hour occurs during a full night's rest, and it does not count against the number of hours the wizard rests/sleeps during that time (i.e. this process does not leave the wizard fatigued, assuming the normal amount of time required for a full night's rest is observed).

The wizard's base number of spells they can prepare and cast each day is given in the table below. In addition, they receive bonus spells per day if they have a high Intelligence score (see Table: Bonus Spell Slots Per Day). When the wizard studies their spellbook and memorizes new spells each night, it resets their available spells back to the number listed for each spell level in the table below, and also restores any bonus slots provided by having a high caster ability score. Unused prepared spells from previous days cannot be saved up and used later. Any prepared spells that the wizard fails to cast before the next time they prepare new spells, or before 24 hours pass (whichever comes first), are lost.

The pluses in parentheses after some of the numbers in the table below indicate when the value has increased from the previous level (hereafter referred to as 'delta values').

Level 0th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th
1st   4 (+4)   2 (+2)   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -
2nd   4   3 (+1)   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -
3rd   4   3   1 (+1)   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -
4th   4   4 (+1)   2 (+1)   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -
5th   5 (+1)   4   2   1 (+1)   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -

Cantrips

Zeroth-level wizard spells are called cantrips. Cantrips are weaker magic spells that are easily cast, often providing useful tricks to make life simpler for the wizard. A wizard knows every cantrip on the Wizard Spells list that falls within their chosen arcane school, their complimentary schools, or the universal school. They cannot ever learn any cantrips from any of the four opposition schools.

While the wizard may know many cantrips, they can only prepare a limited number of them each day, as shown on the Spells Preparable Per Day table (above).

Despite being limited in how many they can prepare each day, the wizard can cast these spells as frequently as they wish, without limit. Unlike spells of level 1 or higher, cantrips do not detach from the wizard's aura when cast. They can be 'swapped out' with a different cantrip during the wizard's nightly preparation of new spells, if desired, but otherwise, they remain available for casting by the wizard indefinitely.

Implement Bonus (Su)

Beginning at 1st level, while wielding a rod, staff, or wand, or any weapon with the Implement quality, you gain an implement bonus to all to-hit rolls you make when casting a spell or activating a spell-like ability. This bonus applies to melee touch attacks, ranged touch attacks, standard melee attacks, or standard ranged attacks. Divine casters may also use their holy symbol as an implement.

The implement bonus is equal to +1 at 1st level, and increases by an additional +1 per 4 class levels, dropping fractions, to a maximum of +9 at level 33 (i.e. +2 at 5th, +3 at 9th, +4 at 13th, +5 at 17th, +6 at 21st, +7 at 25th, +8 at 29th, and +9 at 33rd). Note that, if you multi-class into another class that also gets this bonus, the class levels stack for purposes of calculating this bonus.

If you are not actively wielding a rod, staff, or wand, you do not get this bonus.

Furthermore, casters can flick, twirl, or swoosh a wielded rod, staff, or wand to complete the somatic gestures of any spells they cast, in place of using their empty hand(s). That is, an implement counts as an empty hand for purposes of completing somatic gestures.

When wielding a magic staff in both hands, a caster need only have material components in a readily available storage location (like a Component Pouch). The staff will draw out and consume the components as part of casting the spell, eliminating the need for the caster to pause in wielding the staff to draw the component themselves. This only works if the component is in an accessible place that could normally be pulled from as part of casting a spell. If the component is tucked away in a (non-magical) backpack, stored in a portable hole, or left in the caster's bedside table back in town, the staff has no power to pull components from there.

If you enchant your implement with an enhancement bonus, that bonus is also added to your spell and spell-like ability to-hits, stacking with the implement bonus. However, the enhancement bonus does not add its bonus to the spell or spell-like ability's damage, the way it does with weapon damage. For the rules on enchanting weapons, and how much it costs to do so, see Magic Weapons.

Powerful Cantrip I (Sp)

At 1st level, the wizard chooses one of the first level spells known to them. This spell becomes a cantrip for this wizard, and is thus not expended upon casting. The wizard must still prepare the spell, but it is prepared as though it were a 0th level spell. Despite this, the save DC of the spell chosen is calculated as though it were a 1st level spell.

In addition, in place of the normal casting time listed for the spell selected as the wizard's powerful cantrip, the wizard may now cast that spell as a swift action, but only up to once per round, and only during rounds in which the wizard does not cast a Quickened spell. The powerful cantrip can always be cast at its normal casting time, if the wizard prefers. For example, if the spell normally requires a standard action to cast, the wizard can cast it as a standard action and as a swift action in the same round, if they wish. However, they could not then degrade their move action to a swift action and cast it a third time, since the swift action casting time can only be used once per round.

Each time the wizard gains a level, if they wish, they may change the spell they have chosen as their powerful cantrip, though it must still come from their list of known 1st-level spells. Spells from opposition schools may not be made into powerful cantrips. Powerful cantrips may not have metamagic feats applied to them, but they can be mana burned. They cannot be expended as a spell slot for mana burning other spells, however.

Bonus Feat I (Ex)

At 2nd level, the wizard may select a bonus feat. The wizard may select any feat for which they meet the prerequisites at the time the feat is chosen. Wizards are advised, however, to consider at least some metamagic feats, in order to make use of their higher level spells slots, especially at higher levels.

Arcane Familiar (Su)

At 4th level, the wizard is able to establish a bond with an extra-dimensional creature to help them expand their knowledge and expertise of the Arcane. Familiars are spirits of energy from an extra-dimensional plane of existence that is near the Well of Power. They are inherently magical, and seem eager to bind themselves to wizards who call upon them. When called to the wizard's native plane, the wizard offers the familiar a physical vessel, in the form of a small animal. The familiar subsumes this vessel, and is then able to manifest itself physically on this plane of existence in that shape.

Forming the bond is a 1-hour ritual, during which time the wizard cannot be interrupted. It is typically best to perform this ritual someplace safe, and with strong arcane resonances, such as a wizard's tower, but anywhere will do, technically, if the wizard can't be bothered to do things the right way. A wizard can never have more than one familiar, and once a familiar is bonded to the wizard, the bond persists until the wizard is permanently slain.

Familiar spirits are smart, with strong, vivid personalities, and they strive to be helpful to their wizard. Their actual motives for helping are not well understood, but typically include things like "immortal and bored", or "for the furtherance of Magic", or "because this wizard has some specific fate they are interested in being involved in". Players are encouraged to work with their GMs to come up with a unique and interesting reason why their familiar chose to bond with them.

A familiar has two states of being. They can either manifest their physical form and move independently of the wizard, or they can remain in their ephemeral form and occupy some mysterious place that only the bonded wizard can perceive.

Physical Form

The wizard chooses the physical form they want their familiar to take, at the time they create the bond with the familiar spirit. This form must be a sized-tiny natural animal (popular choices include cats, ravens, crabs, rats, or toads). When you choose what animal type you wish your familiar to have, you may also choose what movement type it possesses from the following four options:

The movement type you choose must be appropriate for the type of animal you choose. A toad can't have Lesser Flight, for example. Once chosen, the animal species and its chosen movement type cannot be changed, except through the re-selection process.

Familiars, like Summoned Monsters, only get a single Standard Action each round with which to act, over and above the wizard's own actions each round. The familiar always acts during the same initiative tick as the wizard, though the wizard can choose when, during their own turns, the familiar takes their action. The wizard can, if they wish, 'gift' some or all of their own actions (standard, move, or swift) to their familiar each round, to allow it to perform more complex actions, at the expense of the wizard's own ability to do things that round.

As long as the familiar remains within 100 feet (20 squares) of the wizard's space, the wizard is able to communicate telepathically with the familiar, and perceive the world through the familiar's senses as if they were the wizard's own senses. Indeed, the familiar does not gain any special senses from their designated animal form, but they can use any senses the wizard possesses. Thus, a cat familiar does not automatically receive Low-Light Vision just for being a cat, but they can use Darkvision or even Blindsense if the wizard happens to have either of those senses themselves. If the familiar is ever more than 100 feet away from the wizard, they are no longer able to communicate or share perceptions with their wizard until they move back into range.

Because of the special bond that wizards share with their familiars, wizards may cast spells they have memorized, and use their familiars as the origin point of the spell, instead of themselves. This means they can send the familiar forward to peek around a corner, and blast a fireball at something the wizard can't even see (but their familiar can), as long as all of the normal the targeting rules for the spell are followed, using the familiar's space as the starting point for the spell. Familiars can also deliver touch spells on behalf of their wizard, and if they are already adjacent to a target, they can do so as part of the same action as the wizard casting the spell (i.e. the familiar doesn't have to use their own Standard Action to perform the touch, assuming they don't need to move first).

However, because familiars are not real animals, they do not have their own stats. Instead, any attacks directed at the familiar are resolved as though they are targeting the wizard — they go against the wizard's armor class, use the wizard's saving throws, apply the wizard's mitigation defenses (e.g. ER or DR), and, if they deal damage, they subtract that damage from the wizard's hit points. As a result, any damage or status conditions that would normally be applied to a familiar in physical form are instead applied to the wizard, even if the attack or effect can't actually reach the wizard. Because of this, familiars cannot actually die unless the wizard dies. If the wizard falls unconscious or is slain, the familiar vanishes, and cannot reappear until the wizard is restored to consciousness. If the wizard is never brought back to life, the familiar simply returns to its native plane, its contract fulfilled.

In the event that a familiar is targeted by an effect that also includes the wizard (such as a fireball that includes both the wizard and their familiar), the attack is resolved against the wizard twice, either with two different to-hit rolls, or two saving throws, as appropriate for the effect. However, the wizard only suffers the effects of the attack once, based on the worst outcome of the two rolls.

While in their physical form, familiars count as a sized-tiny creature that does not threaten any squares. As a result, they can be moved through by allies and enemies alike, and they do not provide flanks for the wizard or their allies. Familiars never suffer squeezing penalties for sharing a space with a creature (though they can suffer squeezing penalties for attempting to fit into a space too small for a sized-tiny creature), and they never inflict squeezing penalties, regardless of the comparative size of the creature they might be sharing the space with. However, the familiar can still provoke attacks of opportunity from threatening enemies, as normal, and any such attacks are resolved against the wizard, as described above.

A familiar in its physical form is extremely useful, but it also makes the wizard twice as likely to be attacked. Any effects on the wizard that might prevent or mitigate attacks against the wizard also apply to the familiar. For example, if the wizard has cast Mirror Image on themselves, it also applies to any attacks made against their familiar. Spells like Blur that require specific conditions be met each round before their benefits are granted (displacing at least 15 feet each round in the case of Blur), only the wizard needs to have met the condition for the benefit to apply to attacks against the familiar.

Ephemeral Form

The familiar's natural state is an ephemeral form of magical energy with no physical presence. A familiar in this state must remain in the wizard's space, but it cannot be targeted by any attacks, effects, or conditions. For all intents and purposes, the familiar doesn't exist to anyone except the wizard. The familiar can still talk to the wizard telepathically, and is still, technically, on this plane of existence, despite having no physical presence.

In addition, while in its ephemeral state, the familiar grants the wizard the benefit of its own wisdom and experience, in the form of a skill bonus. The wizard chooses any one skill that they are able to put ranks into (if it is a skill like Knowledge, or Profession, they must choose a single sub-skill, like Knowledge (Local), or Profession (Leathersmith)), and the familiar grants them a +1 circumstance bonus to that skill. Once the skill is chosen, it cannot be changed except through the re-selection process. This bonus increases by an additional +1 per two experience tiers of the Wizard class that the wizard possesses, after the first (i.e. with three experience tiers (Wizard level 11), it becomes a +2 bonus; with five experience tiers (Wizard level 21), it is a +3 bonus; with all seven experience tiers (Wizard level 31), it is a +4 bonus). This bonus only applies while the familiar is in its ephemeral state; while the familiar is in its physical form, it does not provide the bonus.

Changing forms from Physical to Ephemeral or vice-versa requires a standard action, but that action can come from the familiar or the wizard.

Familiars, despite being outsiders, cannot be banished, and they are not subject to extra damage for being outsiders (unless the wizard is also an outsider); their bond with the wizard is too strong. However, if the familiar is in its physical form, and enters an area where magic does not operate, such as an anti-magic field, they are instantly forced back to their ephemeral state, sharing the wizard's space, and cannot manifest physically again until the wizard leaves the affected area.

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Intrepid Wizard (Levels 6 - 10)

Level Full Attack BAB Saving Throws Base AC Class Features
1st Atk 2nd Atk 3rd Atk 4th Atk Fort Refl Will
6th   +3 (+1)   -2 (+1)   -   -   +2 (+1)   +2 (+1)   +5 (+1)   9 (Wizard Spells), (Arcane School), (Implement Bonus), Mana Burning, Bonus Feat II
7th   +3   -2   -   -   +2   +2   +5   9 Level 4 Spells
8th   +4 (+1)   -1 (+1)   -   -   +2   +2   +6 (+1)   9 Circus Arcana
9th   +4   -1   -   -   +3 (+1)   +3 (+1)   +6   9 Level 5 Spells
10th   +5 (+1)   +0 (+1)   -   -   +3   +3   +7 (+1)   9 Bonus Feat III

Weapon and Armor Proficiency

Wizards are proficient with the Athame, Dagger, Light Crossbow, Heavy Crossbows, Light Mace, Sickle, and Mage's Staff, but not with any type of armor or shield.

Arcane Spells and Armor

Even the lightest of armors can interfere with the complicated gestures required while casting any spell that has a somatic component. The armor and shield descriptions list the arcane spell failure chance for different armors and shields.

If a spell doesn't have a somatic component, an arcane spellcaster can cast it with no arcane spell failure chance while wearing armor. Such spells can also be cast even if the caster's hands are bound or they are grappling (although Concentration checks may still be necessary). The metamagic feat Still Spell allows a spellcaster to prepare or cast a spell without the somatic component at one spell level higher than normal. This also provides a way to cast a spell while wearing armor without risking arcane spell failure.

Wizard Spells (Intrepid Tier)

If you do not already have the Wizard Spells class feature, you gain it at 6th level. See Wizard Spells for details on how this works. You do not gain the 'Spells Preparable Per Day' amounts listed in previous tiers of the Wizard class unless you actually took those previous tiers.

Remember that you also receive bonus spells per day if you have a sufficiently high Intelligence score.

Arcane School (Intrepid Tier)

If you have not already selected an Arcane School to specialize in, you must do so at 6th level. See Arcane School for details on how this works.

If you have already picked an Arcane School, you cannot change it, except through the re-selection process. (Note that, if the reselection process is used to change schools, any spells learned from schools that would become opposition schools under the new choice are lost. The wizard can replace up to one lost spell per wizard level the possess with a new spell of the same spell level as the one being lost, choosing from a school they now have access to. If the wizard loses more spells than the "one per wizard level" would replace, the extra spells are simply lost without replacement. Changes of this magnitude have consequences, and should not be undertaken without due consideration.)

Once chosen, the wizard may only learn, prepare, and cast spells from that specific school, from the two schools complementary to that school, and from the Universal school. Consequently, they may never learn spells from the four schools of magic that are in opposition to their chosen arcane school. Wizards receive no bonuses or penalties for casting spells from their primary school, complementary schools, or the Universal school. They are all cast with the same precision and ability as those from the primary school.

Spells Known (Intrepid Tier)

Wizards perform a certain amount of spell research between adventures. Each time a character attains a new wizard level, they gain two spells of their choice to add to their spellbook. The two free spells must be of spell levels they can cast. At least one of the two free spells learned must come from the wizard's chosen primary arcane school.

Wizards cannot typically 'unlearn' a spell, once it is known (and knowing more spells is generally a very good thing for a wizard, even if a particular spell isn't especially useful to them). However, with GM's approval, a wizard can trade out up to one spell for free for another spell of equal spell level from a school they are allowed to learn, up to once per new wizard level gained.

Spells Preparable Per Day (Intrepid Tier)

The following table shows how many spells the wizard can actually prepare and cast each day at this experience tier. As a wizard grows in power and level, their auras become stronger, their understanding of the fundamental forces of magic improves, and thus the wizard gains access to higher level spells, and the ability to prepare and cast more of them each day.

The wizard's base daily allotment of preparable spells is given in the table below. In addition, they receive bonus spells per day if they have a high Intelligence score (see Table: Bonus Spell Slots Per Day). When the wizard studies their spellbook and memorizes new spells each night during a full night's rest, it resets their available spells back to the number listed for each spell level in the table below, and also restores any bonus slots provided by having a high caster ability score. Unused prepared spells from previous days cannot be saved up and used later. Any prepared spells that the wizard fails to cast before the next time they prepare new spells, or before 24 hours pass (whichever comes first), are lost.

To prepare or cast a spell, a wizard must have an Intelligence score equal to at least 10 + the spell level.

The pluses in parentheses after some of the numbers in the table below indicate when the value has increased from the previous level (hereafter referred to as 'delta values'). Characters who are multi-classing only receive the delta values of each spell level, rather than the full amount listed (unless, of course, they are the same).

Level 0th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th
6th   5   4   3 (+1)   2 (+1)   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -
7th   5   5 (+1)   3   2   1 (+1)   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -
8th   5   5   3   3 (+1)   2 (+1)   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -
9th   5   5   4 (+1)   3   2   1 (+1)   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -
10th   5   5   4   3   3 (+1)   2 (+1)   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -

Cantrips (Intrepid Tier)

A wizard knows every cantrip on the Wizard Spells list that falls within their chosen arcane school, their complimentary schools, or the universal school. They cannot ever learn any cantrips from any of the four opposition schools.

While the wizard may know many cantrips, they can only prepare a limited number of them each day, as shown on the Spells Preparable Per Day table (above).

Despite being limited in how many they can prepare each day, the wizard can cast these spells as frequently as they wish, without limit. Unlike spells of level 1 or higher, cantrips do not detach from the wizard's aura when cast. They can be 'swapped out' with a different cantrip during the wizard's nightly preparation of new spells, if desired, but otherwise, they remain available for casting by the wizard indefinitely.

Implement Bonus (Intrepid Tier)

If you do not already have the Implement Bonus class feature, you gain it at 6th level. See Implement Bonus for details on how this works.

Mana Burning (Sp)

  • Note: In the context of mana burning, a 'spell' can refer to any of spells, extracts, or poultices. Any time a 'spell' is referred to in this section, it applies to any or all of these three types. If you are multi-classed, dual-classed, or otherwise have access to spells, extracts, and/or poultices, any of them may be burned to boost any of the others. They are interchangeable with regards to mana burning.

Beginning at 5th level, when casting a spell, you can expend one or more additional spells as part of the same action as casting the spell, in order to increase that spell's destructive power.

To understand mana burning, you must understand four concepts: spell level, caster level, character level, and Circle.

A spell's level is a measure of how difficult it is to learn, and usually a factor in how powerful its effects are. Paladins and Rangers only have spells that go up to level 4, Bards and Alchemists only have spells that go up to level 6. Clerics, Druids, Sorcerers, and Wizards have spells that go up to level 9. Conventional spells do not go above level 9, though you can apply metamagic feats to a spell to cause its level to go as high as level 17 (assuming your character class grants spell slots that high).

Caster level is how many levels a character possesses in a specific spellcasting class. If you are multi-classed or dual-classed, your caster level only goes up if you level in a class that can cast spells. If you gain levels in a non-spellcasting class, your caster level remains frozen at the sum of the levels you gained in spellcasting classes only. Caster level is usually used to determine how difficult it is to resist the effects of a spell (if it grants a saving throw). Other variables in a spell can also be affected by caster level, such as a spell's range, or even how many targets it can affect at once.

Character level is the character's total level. That is, it is the sum of all class levels from any class the character has taken. If a character doesn't multi-class or dual-class (i.e. they only have one character class), their character level is equal to their class level. If their sole class is a spellcasting class, their character level is also equal to their caster level.

Finally, Circles are a measure of how much base damage a spell does, relative to the caster's character level. If a spell has a Circle listed, it will be highlighted in orange in the spell's description. Every spell has a Level, but not every spell has a Circle. If a spell does not have a Circle, it generally does no damage, or has a custom damage profile. Spells that do not have a Circle listed cannot be mana burned.

Mana Burned spells (or spell slots) are used up for the day, exactly as though they had been cast. For each additional spell you burn in the casting, you increase the spell's Circle by one step, increasing the spell's base damage dealt. You cannot mana burn cantrips (or orisons, or powerful cantrips), but you can mana burn any spell you have either memorized (if you must prepare spells in advance) or have available (if you can spontaneously cast spells).

Aside from certain arcane bloodlines and certain expensive magic items, the only way to increase a spell's Circle is by mana burning one or more additional spells at the same time that the spell is being cast (as part of the same action). This means, for example, that memorizing a spell in a higher level slot than the minimum required does not raise the spell's circle. Similarly, memorizing a spell in a higher level slot because it has one or more Metamagic Feats applied to it does not increase the spell's Circle.

For each extra spell burned (beyond the spell actually being cast), the spell's Circle moves up one step on the damage scale.

Mana Burn Circle Damage

Spell Circle Burn Cost Req'd Char Level Base Dice Max Dice
0 N/A N/A 1d4 per 2 character levels max of 4d4 at character level 8
1 N/A 1st 1d6 per character level max of 4d6 at character level 4
2 +1 3rd 1d6 per character level max of 6d6 at character level 6
3 +1 5th 1d6 per character level max of 10d6 at character level 10
4 +1 7th 1d6+1 per character level max of 12d6+12 at character level 12
5 +1 9th 1d6+1 per character level max of 15d6+15 at character level 15
6 +1 11th 1d6+2 per character level max of 16d6+32 at character level 16
7 +1 13th 1d6+2 per character level max of 20d6+40 at character level 20
8 +1 15th 1d6+3 per character level max of 21d6+63 at character level 21
9 +1 17th 1d6+3 per character level max of 25d6+75 at character level 25
10 +1 19th 1d6+4 per character level max of 25d6+100 at character level 25
11 +1 21st 1d6+5 per character level max of 25d6+125 at character level 25
12 +1 23rd 1d6+6 per character level max of 27d6+162 at character level 27
13 +1 25th 1d6+7 per character level max of 27d6+189 at character level 27
14 +1 27th 1d6+8 per character level max of 29d6+232 at character level 29
15 +1 29th 1d6+9 per character level max of 29d6+261 at character level 29
16 +1 31st 1d6+10 per character level max of 30d6+300 at character level 30
17 +1 33rd 1d6+11 per character level max of 30d6+330 at character level 30
18 +1 35th 1d6+12 per character level max of 30d6+360 at character level 30


There is also a maximum spell circle you can raise a given spell, based on your character level. This maximum is: (total character level + 1) ÷ 2, round down. Note that this is NOT based on the character's caster level or class level, but their total character level, making this an attractive option for multi-classed or dual-classed characters. Furthermore, the maximum is unaffected by classes who learn higher level spell slots at a slower pace than full casters. For example, even though a bard cannot cast 3rd level spells at 5th level, they can cast a 2nd level spell and mana burn it to Circle 3 damage, dealing the equivalent of a third level spell.

All benefits of any Metamagic Feats applied to the spell being cast are applied after all Mana Burning has been done. That is, you can memorize a Maximized Fireball (using a sixth level spell slot — 3 for the spell's normal spell level, and 3 for the Maximize metamagic feat), and then burn four additional spell slots of any other spell level to increase the Maximized Fireball's Circle 3 damage to Circle 7 damage (assuming you are high enough level to use Circle 7 damage), and the fireball will inflict maximized Circle 7 damage.

  • Example: A 18th level wizard casts the old classic, fireball. Fireball does Circle 3 damage (1d6 per character level, max 10d6). The wizard mana burns it up to Circle 9 damage (1d6+3 per level, max 25d6+75). In order to do this, the wizard must expend the base 3rd level slot for the Fireball spell, and then six spell slots of any spell level to move the Circle up by six steps. Since the wizard is 18th level, Circle 9 is the maximum Circle they could mana burn a spell up to, and by bumping the Fireball spell to Circle nine, they will deal 18d6+54 points of damage with it, far exceeding the normal limits of a fireball.

Bonus Feat II (Ex)

At 6th level, the wizard may select a bonus feat. The wizard may select any feat for which they meet the prerequisites at the time the feat is chosen. Wizards are advised, however, to consider at least some metamagic feats, in order to make use of their higher level spells slots, especially at higher levels.

Circus Arcana (Su)

At 8th level, the wizard figures out how to tap into the resilience of their own auras when casting spells, taking advantage of their pliability when used in unique ways each day to make their spells more powerful than they could normally be.

The first time each day that a wizard casts a particular spell, that spell gains one of two bonuses (caster's choice). Either the save DC of the spell is improved by +1, or the damage inflicted by the spell improves by +1 per die rolled.

Example: An 8th level wizard casts Bells for the first time in a day. Because they have not yet cast this spell today, the caster may either improve the save DC of the spell by +1, or cause the spell to deal 1d6+1 per caster level (8d6+8, in this case), instead of its normal 1d6 per caster level. If the wizard casts Bells again that same day, it is cast normally, without either of these bonuses, regardless of which bonus the wizard chose to apply.

Circus Arcana applies to the base spell being cast, regardless of any metamagic feats or mana burning that are applied to that base spell. Thus, in the example above, if the wizard cast an unmodified Bells spell, and then cast a Bells spell they memorized with the Empower Spell metamagic feat, it would count as the same spell, and therefore not receive the Circus Arcana bonus. The exception to this rule is when a wizard creates a permanently modified version of a spell through the Spell Research process. When such a modified spell is successfully learned by the wizard, that spell counts as a new base spell for purposes of Circus Arcana; it no longer counts as being the same as its base spell.

Bonus Feat III (Ex)

At 10th level, the wizard may select a bonus feat. The wizard may select any feat for which they meet the prerequisites at the time the feat is chosen. Wizards are advised, however, to consider at least some metamagic feats, in order to make use of their higher level spells slots, especially at higher levels.

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Heroic Wizard (Levels 11 - 15)

Level Full Attack BAB Saving Throws Base AC Class Features
1st Atk 2nd Atk 3rd Atk 4th Atk Fort Refl Will
11th   +5   +0   -   -   +3   +3   +7   9 (Wizard Spells), (Arcane School), (Implement Bonus), (Mana Burning), Level 6 Spells, Powerful Cantrip II
12th   +6 (+1)   +1 (+1)   -   -   +4 (+1)   +4 (+1)   +8 (+1)   9 High Magic I
13th   +6   +1   -   -   +4   +4   +8   9 Level 7 Spells
14th   +7 (+1)   +2 (+1)   -   -   +4   +4   +9 (+1)   9 Bonus Feat IV
15th   +7   +2   -   -   +5 (+1)   +5 (+1)   +9   9 Level 8 Spells

Weapon and Armor Proficiency

Wizards are proficient with the Athame, Dagger, Light Crossbow, Heavy Crossbows, Light Mace, Sickle, and Mage's Staff, but not with any type of armor or shield.

Arcane Spells and Armor

Even the lightest of armors can interfere with the complicated gestures required while casting any spell that has a somatic component. The armor and shield descriptions list the arcane spell failure chance for different armors and shields.

If a spell doesn't have a somatic component, an arcane spellcaster can cast it with no arcane spell failure chance while wearing armor. Such spells can also be cast even if the caster's hands are bound or they are grappling (although Concentration checks may still be necessary). The metamagic feat Still Spell allows a spellcaster to prepare or cast a spell without the somatic component at one spell level higher than normal. This also provides a way to cast a spell while wearing armor without risking arcane spell failure.

Wizard Spells (Heroic Tier)

If you do not already have the Wizard Spells class feature, you gain it at 11th level. See Wizard Spells for details on how this works. You do not gain the 'Spells Preparable Per Day' amounts listed in previous tiers of the Wizard class unless you actually took those previous tiers.

Remember that you also receive bonus spells per day if you have a sufficiently high Intelligence score.

Arcane School (Heroic Tier)

If you have not already selected an Arcane School to specialize in, you must do so at 11th level. See Arcane School for details on how this works.

If you have already picked an Arcane School, you cannot change it, except through the re-selection process. (Note that, if the reselection process is used to change schools, any spells learned from schools that would become opposition schools under the new choice are lost. The wizard can replace up to one lost spell per wizard level the possess with a new spell of the same spell level as the one being lost, choosing from a school they now have access to. If the wizard loses more spells than the "one per wizard level" would replace, the extra spells are simply lost without replacement. Changes of this magnitude have consequences, and should not be undertaken without due consideration.)

Once chosen, the wizard may only learn, prepare, and cast spells from that specific school, from the two schools complementary to that school, and from the Universal school. Consequently, they may never learn spells from the four schools of magic that are in opposition to their chosen arcane school. Wizards receive no bonuses or penalties for casting spells from their primary school, complementary schools, or the Universal school. They are all cast with the same precision and ability as those from the primary school.

Spells Known (Heroic Tier)

Wizards perform a certain amount of spell research between adventures. Each time a character attains a new wizard level, they gain two spells of their choice to add to their spellbook. The two free spells must be of spell levels they can cast. At least one of the two free spells learned must come from the wizard's chosen primary arcane school.

Wizards cannot typically 'unlearn' a spell, once it is known (and knowing more spells is generally a very good thing for a wizard, even if a particular spell isn't especially useful to them). However, with GM's approval, a wizard can trade out up to one spell for free for another spell of equal spell level from a school they are allowed to learn, up to once per new wizard level gained.

Spells Preparable Per Day (Heroic Tier)

The following table shows how many spells the wizard can actually prepare and cast each day at this experience tier. As a wizard grows in power and level, their auras become stronger, their understanding of the fundamental forces of magic improves, and thus the wizard gains access to higher level spells, and the ability to prepare and cast more of them each day.

The wizard's base daily allotment of preparable spells is given in the table below. In addition, they receive bonus spells per day if they have a high Intelligence score (see Table: Bonus Spell Slots Per Day). When the wizard studies their spellbook and memorizes new spells each night during a full night's rest, it resets their available spells back to the number listed for each spell level in the table below, and also restores any bonus slots provided by having a high caster ability score. Unused prepared spells from previous days cannot be saved up and used later. Any prepared spells that the wizard fails to cast before the next time they prepare new spells, or before 24 hours pass (whichever comes first), are lost.

To prepare or cast a spell, a wizard must have an Intelligence score equal to at least 10 + the spell level.

The pluses in parentheses after some of the numbers in the table below indicate when the value has increased from the previous level (hereafter referred to as 'delta values'). Characters who are multi-classing only receive the delta values of each spell level, rather than the full amount listed (unless, of course, they are the same).

Level 0th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th
11th   5   5   4   4 (+1)   3   2   1 (+1)   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -
12th   5   5   4   4   3   3 (+1)   2 (+1)   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -
13th   5   5   4   4   4 (+1)   3   2   1 (+1)   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -
14th   5   5   4   4   4   3   3 (+1)   2 (+1)   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -
15th   6 (+1)   5   4   4   4   4 (+1)   3   2   1 (+1)   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -

Cantrips (Heroic Tier)

A wizard knows every cantrip on the Wizard Spells list that falls within their chosen arcane school, their complimentary schools, or the universal school. They cannot ever learn any cantrips from any of the four opposition schools.

While the wizard may know many cantrips, they can only prepare a limited number of them each day, as shown on the Spells Preparable Per Day table (above).

Despite being limited in how many they can prepare each day, the wizard can cast these spells as frequently as they wish, without limit. Unlike spells of level 1 or higher, cantrips do not detach from the wizard's aura when cast. They can be 'swapped out' with a different cantrip during the wizard's nightly preparation of new spells, if desired, but otherwise, they remain available for casting by the wizard indefinitely.

Implement Bonus (Heroic Tier)

If you do not already have the Implement Bonus class feature, you gain it at 11th level. See Implement Bonus for details on how this works.

Mana Burning (Heroic Tier)

If you do not already have the Mana Burning class feature, you gain it at 11th level. See Mana Burning for details on how this works.

Powerful Cantrip II (Sp)

At 11th level, the wizard chooses one of the second level spells known to them. This spell becomes a cantrip for this wizard, and is thus not expended upon casting. The wizard must still prepare the spell, but it is prepared as though it were a 0th-level spell. (To be clear, this is in addition to the 1st level spell they know from Powerful Cantrip I, assuming they possess that class feature as well) Despite this, the save DC of the spell chosen is calculated as though it were a 2nd level spell.

In addition, in place of the normal casting time listed for the spell selected as the wizard's powerful cantrip, the wizard may now cast that spell as a swift action, but only up to once per round, and only during rounds in which the wizard does not cast a Quickened spell. The powerful cantrip can always be cast at its normal casting time, if the wizard prefers. For example, if the spell normally requires a standard action to cast, the wizard can cast it as a standard action and as a swift action in the same round, if they wish. However, they could not then degrade their move action to a swift action and cast it a third time, since the swift action casting time can only be used once per round.

Each time the wizard gains a level, if they wish, they may change the spell they have chosen as their powerful cantrip, though it must still come their list of known 2nd-level spells. Spells from opposition schools may not be made into powerful cantrips. Powerful cantrips may not have metamagic feats applied to them, but they can be mana burned. They cannot be expended as a spell slot for mana burning other spells, however.

High Magic I (Sp)

At 12th level, the wizard begins to learn the subtle art of augmenting their magic while only using the barest minimum of power necessary to do so. High Magic I allows the wizard to apply metamagic feats they know to their 1st or 2nd level spells, and reduce the total spell level increase caused by those metamagic feats by 1, when doing so.

Example: If the wizard wants to apply the Empower Spell (+2 spell level increase) and Maximize Spell (+3 spell level increase) feats to a 1st level spell, they would normally increase the spell slot required to memorize that spell by +5, thus requiring a 6th level spell slot to memorize this maximized, empowered 1st-level spell. With High Magic I, the wizard can reduce this to only requiring a 5th level spell slot, instead.

High Magic only reduces the total spell level increase of all metamagic feats being applied to a 1st- or 2nd--level spell, not the spell level increase for each metamagic feat used. High Magic can reduce the spell level increase of metamagic down to zero, but it cannot reduce the base spell level of the spell.

Bonus Feat IV (Ex)

At 14th level, the wizard may select a bonus feat. The wizard may select any feat for which they meet the prerequisites at the time the feat is chosen. Wizards are advised, however, to consider at least some metamagic feats, in order to make use of their higher level spells slots, especially at higher levels.

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Undaunted Wizard (Levels 16 - 20)

Level Full Attack BAB Saving Throws Base AC Class Features
1st Atk 2nd Atk 3rd Atk 4th Atk Fort Refl Will
16th   +8 (+1)   +3 (+1)   -   -   +5   +5   +10 (+1)   9 (Wizard Spells), (Arcane School), (Implement Bonus), (Mana Burning), Occultis Mysteria, High Magic II
17th   +8   +3   -   -   +5   +5   +10   9 Level 9 Spells
18th   +9 (+1)   +4 (+1)   -   -   +6 (+1)   +6 (+1)   +11 (+1)   9 Bonus Feat V
19th   +9   +4   -   -   +6   +6   +11   9 Level 10 Spells
20th   +10 (+1)   +5 (+1)   -   -   +6   +6   +12 (+1)   9 High Magic III

Weapon and Armor Proficiency

Wizards are proficient with the Athame, Dagger, Light Crossbow, Heavy Crossbows, Light Mace, Sickle, and Mage's Staff, but not with any type of armor or shield.

Arcane Spells and Armor

Even the lightest of armors can interfere with the complicated gestures required while casting any spell that has a somatic component. The armor and shield descriptions list the arcane spell failure chance for different armors and shields.

If a spell doesn't have a somatic component, an arcane spellcaster can cast it with no arcane spell failure chance while wearing armor. Such spells can also be cast even if the caster's hands are bound or they are grappling (although Concentration checks may still be necessary). The metamagic feat Still Spell allows a spellcaster to prepare or cast a spell without the somatic component at one spell level higher than normal. This also provides a way to cast a spell while wearing armor without risking arcane spell failure.

Wizard Spells (Undaunted Tier)

If you do not already have the Wizard Spells class feature, you gain it at 16th level. See Wizard Spells for details on how this works. You do not gain the 'Spells Preparable Per Day' amounts listed in previous tiers of the Wizard class unless you actually took those previous tiers.

Remember that you also receive bonus spells per day if you have a sufficiently high Intelligence score.

Arcane School (Undaunted Tier)

If you have not already selected an Arcane School to specialize in, you must do so at 16th level. See Arcane School for details on how this works.

If you have already picked an Arcane School, you cannot change it, except through the re-selection process. (Note that, if the reselection process is used to change schools, any spells learned from schools that would become opposition schools under the new choice are lost. The wizard can replace up to one lost spell per wizard level the possess with a new spell of the same spell level as the one being lost, choosing from a school they now have access to. If the wizard loses more spells than the "one per wizard level" would replace, the extra spells are simply lost without replacement. Changes of this magnitude have consequences, and should not be undertaken without due consideration.)

Once chosen, the wizard may only learn, prepare, and cast spells from that specific school, from the two schools complementary to that school, and from the Universal school. Consequently, they may never learn spells from the four schools of magic that are in opposition to their chosen arcane school. Wizards receive no bonuses or penalties for casting spells from their primary school, complementary schools, or the Universal school. They are all cast with the same precision and ability as those from the primary school.

Spells Known (Undaunted Tier)

Wizards perform a certain amount of spell research between adventures. Each time a character attains a new wizard level, they gain two spells of their choice to add to their spellbook. The two free spells must be of spell levels they can cast. At least one of the two free spells learned must come from the wizard's chosen primary arcane school.

Wizards cannot typically 'unlearn' a spell, once it is known (and knowing more spells is generally a very good thing for a wizard, even if a particular spell isn't especially useful to them). However, with GM's approval, a wizard can trade out up to one spell for free for another spell of equal spell level from a school they are allowed to learn, up to once per new wizard level gained.

Spells Preparable Per Day (Undaunted Tier)

The following table shows how many spells the wizard can actually prepare and cast each day at this experience tier. As a wizard grows in power and level, their auras become stronger, their understanding of the fundamental forces of magic improves, and thus the wizard gains access to higher level spells, and the ability to prepare and cast more of them each day.

The wizard's base daily allotment of preparable spells is given in the table below. In addition, they receive bonus spells per day if they have a high Intelligence score (see Table: Bonus Spell Slots Per Day). When the wizard studies their spellbook and memorizes new spells each night during a full night's rest, it resets their available spells back to the number listed for each spell level in the table below, and also restores any bonus slots provided by having a high caster ability score. Unused prepared spells from previous days cannot be saved up and used later. Any prepared spells that the wizard fails to cast before the next time they prepare new spells, or before 24 hours pass (whichever comes first), are lost.

To prepare or cast a spell, a wizard must have an Intelligence score equal to at least 10 + the spell level.

The pluses in parentheses after some of the numbers in the table below indicate when the value has increased from the previous level (hereafter referred to as 'delta values'). Characters who are multi-classing only receive the delta values of each spell level, rather than the full amount listed (unless, of course, they are the same).

Level 0th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th
16th   6   6 (+1)   4   4   4   4   3   3 (+1)   2 (+1)   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -
17th   6   6   4   4   4   4   4 (+1)   3   2   1 (+1)   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -
18th   6   6   5 (+1)   4   4   4   4   3   3 (+1)   2 (+1)   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -
19th   6   6   5   5 (+1)   4   4   4   4 (+1)   3   2   1 (+1)   -   -   -   -   -   -   -
20th   6   6   5   5   4   4   4   4   3   3 (+1)   2 (+1)   -   -   -   -   -   -   -

Cantrips (Undaunted Tier)

A wizard knows every cantrip on the Wizard Spells list that falls within their chosen arcane school, their complimentary schools, or the universal school. They cannot ever learn any cantrips from any of the four opposition schools.

While the wizard may know many cantrips, they can only prepare a limited number of them each day, as shown on the Spells Preparable Per Day table (above).

Despite being limited in how many they can prepare each day, the wizard can cast these spells as frequently as they wish, without limit. Unlike spells of level 1 or higher, cantrips do not detach from the wizard's aura when cast. They can be 'swapped out' with a different cantrip during the wizard's nightly preparation of new spells, if desired, but otherwise, they remain available for casting by the wizard indefinitely.

Implement Bonus (Undaunted Tier)

If you do not already have the Implement Bonus class feature, you gain it at 16th level. See Implement Bonus for details on how this works.

Mana Burning (Undaunted Tier)

If you do not already have the Mana Burning class feature, you gain it at 16th level. See Mana Burning for details on how this works.

Occultis Mysteria (Su)

At 16th level, the wizard begins to truly exploit their deep and profound understanding of the Arcane, and how magic functions at a fundamental level. The wizard is now able to grant themselves permanent bonuses based on the quantity of unique spells they have inscribed into their spellbook. Knowledge truly is power.

For every 10 spells of a given Arcane School that the wizard inscribes into their spellbooks, they gain a permanent bonus, depending on the school of magic:

  • Abjuration: For every 10 abjuration spells a wizard scribes into their spellbook, they gain 3 points of Energy Resistance versus all energy damage types (ER 3/-). This ability is always active.
  • Conjuration: For every 10 conjuration spells a wizard scribes into their spellbook, they can, once per day as a free action, declare that their next spell will ignore a target creature's Spell Resistance, or that creature's miss chance (due to concealment, or any other ability that grants it a miss chance). The wizard must still be able to target the creature normally (i.e. meeting any line-of-sight or line-of-effect requirements for the spell). This ability only bypasses SR or Miss Chance on a single target per use. If a spell targets multiple creatures, the wizard must either expend multiple uses of this ability, or choose the one target they are affecting with it.
  • Enchantment: For every 10 enchantment spells that a wizard scribes into their spellbook, they can, once per day as a free action, declare that their next spell will affect one additional target, beyond what it normally affects. This ability can only be used on spells that target specific creatures (i.e. not area of effect spells that target all creatures in an area), and only spells that can target more than one creature at a time (even if the wizard isn't high enough level to target a second creature with that spell). The additional target must still be within the listed range of the spell, and follow any other targeting requirements of the spell. This ability can only be applied to a given spell a single time, even if the wizard has enough enchantment spells scribed to use the ability multiple times per day.
  • Evocation: For every 10 evocation spells that a wizard scribes into their spellbook, they increase the damage dealt by any damaging spell they cast by +5. This ability can only be applied to spells that natively inflict damage; it has no effect on spells that do not inflict damage. If the spell damages multiple creatures, this bonus damage is applied to all targets of the spell. This ability is always active.
  • Illusion: For every 10 illusion spells that a wizard scribes into their spellbook, they can, once per day as an immediate action, declare that an attack that just hit them as a 50% Miss Chance, as though the wizard had Total Concealment against that attack. If the attack misses as a result of this miss chance, it is resolved as a miss. This ability can never be used more than once per round, even with the use of action points.
  • Necromancy: For every 10 necromancy spells that a wizard scribes into their spellbook, they permanently increase their maximum hit points by +5. This ability is always active.
  • Transmutation: For every 10 transmutation spells that a wizard scribes into their spellbook, they gain 3 generic spell slots per day that they can use as fuel for mana burning a spell they cast. The generic slots cannot, themselves, be used to memorize or cast a spell; they can only be used to mana burn a spell the wizard is casting. The wizard can use any or all of these slots to mana burn a single spell, or spread them out among multiple spells, as they wish, as long as they do not exceed the normal limits of mana burning, based on their current character level.
  • Universal: For every 10 universal spells that a wizard scribes into their spellbook, they permanently increase the Saving Throw DC's of any spell they cast by +1. This Save DC increase stacks with any other bonuses they receive from feats, class features, magic items, or any other sources that similarly increase spell save DC's. This ability is always active.

Unfortunately, there are limits to how much knowledge a wizard can glean from scribed spells. Each of the bonuses listed above can only be gained a maximum number of times based on the number of experience tiers of the Wizard class that the wizard possesses (in addition to the requirement to scribe 10 spells per iteration of the bonus).

Example: A wizard with four tiers of the Wizard class (i.e. Wizard level 16), who has inscribed 60 abjuration spells into their spellbook, could only receive a maximum of ER 12/-, since their wizard tier isn't high enough to gain the entire bonus they have unlocked. As soon as they gain a new tier (at Wizard level 21), the bonus would automatically increase by one additional iteration (to ER 15/-).

A wizard can inscribe any spell from the Wizard spell list into their spellbook that they gain access to, even if it is from an Arcane School in opposition to their own. They obviously can never cast spells from their opposition school, but they can still gain the above bonuses from these spells by scribing 10 or more of them into their spellbooks.

High Magic II (Sp)

If you do not already have the High Magic I class feature, you gain it at 16th level. See High Magic I for details on how this works.

If you do already have the High Magic I class feature from a previous tier of the Wizard class, it improves at 16th level, instead. High Magic II allows the wizard to apply metamagic feats they know to their 1st through 4th level spells (instead of 1st or 2nd level spells), and reduce the total spell level increase caused by those metamagic feats by 2, when doing so (instead of 1).

Example: If the wizard wants to apply the Empower Spell (+2 spell level increase) and Maximize Spell (+3 spell level increase) feats to a 1st level spell, they would normally increase the spell slot required to memorize that spell by +5, thus requiring a 6th-level spell slot to memorize this maximized, empowered 1st-level spell. With High Magic II, the wizard can reduce this to only requiring a 4th-level spell slot, instead.

High Magic only reduces the total spell level increase of all metamagic feats being applied to a 1st-, 2nd-, or 3rd-level spell, not the spell level increase for each metamagic feat used. High Magic can reduce the spell level increase of metamagic down to zero, but it cannot reduce the base spell level of the spell.

Bonus Feat V (Ex)

At 18th level, the wizard may select a bonus feat. The wizard may select any feat for which they meet the prerequisites at the time the feat is chosen. Wizards are advised, however, to consider at least some metamagic feats, in order to make use of their higher level spells slots, especially at higher levels.

High Magic III (Sp)

If you do not already have the High Magic I class feature, you gain it at 20th level. See High Magic I for details on how this works.

If you have the High Magic I class feature, but you do not already have the High Magic II class feature, you gain it at 20th level, instead. See High Magic II for details on how this works.

If you already have both the High Magic I and the High Magic II class features from previous tiers of the Wizard class, they improve at 20th level, instead. High Magic III allows the wizard to apply the metamagic level increase reduction of High Magic to their 1st through 6th level spells (instead of 1st through 4th level). High Magic III still reduces the total spell level increase caused by metamagic feats by 2, when doing so (just as High Magic II did).

Example: If the wizard wants to apply the Empower Spell (+2 spell level increase) and Maximize Spell (+3 spell level increase) feats to a 1st level spell, they would normally increase the spell slot required to memorize that spell by +5, thus requiring a 6th-level spell slot to memorize this maximized, empowered 1st-level spell. With High Magic III, the wizard can reduce this to only requiring a 4th-level spell slot, instead.

High Magic only reduces the total spell level increase of all metamagic feats being applied to a 1st-, 2nd-, 3rd-, 4th-, 5th-, or 6th-level spell, not the spell level increase for each metamagic feat used. High Magic can reduce the spell level increase of metamagic down to zero, but it cannot reduce the base spell level of the spell.

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Valorous Wizard (Levels 21 - 25)

Level Full Attack BAB Saving Throws Base AC Class Features
1st Atk 2nd Atk 3rd Atk 4th Atk Fort Refl Will
21st   +11 (+1)   +6 (+1)   -   -   +7 (+1)   +7 (+1)   +13 (+1)   9 (Wizard Spells), (Arcane School), (Implement Bonus), (Mana Burning), Level 11 Spells, Powerful Cantrip III
22nd   +11   +6   -   -   +7   +7   +13   9 Bonus Feat VI
23rd   +12 (+1)   +7 (+1)   -   -   +8 (+1)   +8 (+1)   +14 (+1)   9 Level 12 Spells
24th   +12   +7   -   -   +8   +8   +14   9 High Magic IV
25th   +13 (+1)   +8 (+1)   -   -   +9 (+1)   +9 (+1)   +15 (+1)   9 Level 13 Spells

Weapon and Armor Proficiency

Wizards are proficient with the Athame, Dagger, Light Crossbow, Heavy Crossbows, Light Mace, Sickle, and Mage's Staff, but not with any type of armor or shield.

Arcane Spells and Armor

Even the lightest of armors can interfere with the complicated gestures required while casting any spell that has a somatic component. The armor and shield descriptions list the arcane spell failure chance for different armors and shields.

If a spell doesn't have a somatic component, an arcane spellcaster can cast it with no arcane spell failure chance while wearing armor. Such spells can also be cast even if the caster's hands are bound or they are grappling (although Concentration checks may still be necessary). The metamagic feat Still Spell allows a spellcaster to prepare or cast a spell without the somatic component at one spell level higher than normal. This also provides a way to cast a spell while wearing armor without risking arcane spell failure.

Wizard Spells (Valorous Tier)

If you do not already have the Wizard Spells class feature, you gain it at 21st level. See Wizard Spells for details on how this works. You do not gain the 'Spells Preparable Per Day' amounts listed in previous tiers of the Wizard class unless you actually took those previous tiers.

Remember that you also receive bonus spells per day if you have a sufficiently high Intelligence score.

Arcane School (Valorous Tier)

If you have not already selected an Arcane School to specialize in, you must do so at 21st level. See Arcane School for details on how this works.

If you have already picked an Arcane School, you cannot change it, except through the re-selection process. (Note that, if the reselection process is used to change schools, any spells learned from schools that would become opposition schools under the new choice are lost. The wizard can replace up to one lost spell per wizard level the possess with a new spell of the same spell level as the one being lost, choosing from a school they now have access to. If the wizard loses more spells than the "one per wizard level" would replace, the extra spells are simply lost without replacement. Changes of this magnitude have consequences, and should not be undertaken without due consideration.)

Once chosen, the wizard may only learn, prepare, and cast spells from that specific school, from the two schools complementary to that school, and from the Universal school. Consequently, they may never learn spells from the four schools of magic that are in opposition to their chosen arcane school. Wizards receive no bonuses or penalties for casting spells from their primary school, complementary schools, or the Universal school. They are all cast with the same precision and ability as those from the primary school.

Spells Known (Valorous Tier)

Wizards perform a certain amount of spell research between adventures. Each time a character attains a new wizard level, they gain two spells of their choice to add to their spellbook. The two free spells must be of spell levels they can cast. At least one of the two free spells learned must come from the wizard's chosen primary arcane school.

Wizards cannot typically 'unlearn' a spell, once it is known (and knowing more spells is generally a very good thing for a wizard, even if a particular spell isn't especially useful to them). However, with GM's approval, a wizard can trade out up to one spell for free for another spell of equal spell level from a school they are allowed to learn, up to once per new wizard level gained.

Spells Preparable Per Day (Valorous Tier)

The following table shows how many spells the wizard can actually prepare and cast each day at this experience tier. As a wizard grows in power and level, their auras become stronger, their understanding of the fundamental forces of magic improves, and thus the wizard gains access to higher level spells, and the ability to prepare and cast more of them each day.

The wizard's base daily allotment of preparable spells is given in the table below. In addition, they receive bonus spells per day if they have a high Intelligence score (see Table: Bonus Spell Slots Per Day). When the wizard studies their spellbook and memorizes new spells each night during a full night's rest, it resets their available spells back to the number listed for each spell level in the table below, and also restores any bonus slots provided by having a high caster ability score. Unused prepared spells from previous days cannot be saved up and used later. Any prepared spells that the wizard fails to cast before the next time they prepare new spells, or before 24 hours pass (whichever comes first), are lost.

To prepare or cast a spell, a wizard must have an Intelligence score equal to at least 10 + the spell level.

The pluses in parentheses after some of the numbers in the table below indicate when the value has increased from the previous level (hereafter referred to as 'delta values'). Characters who are multi-classing only receive the delta values of each spell level, rather than the full amount listed (unless, of course, they are the same).

Level 0th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th
21st   6   6   5   5   5 (+1)   4   4   4   4 (+1)   3   2   1 (+1)   -   -   -   -   -   -
22nd   6   6   5   5   5   5 (+1)   4   4   4   3   3 (+1)   2 (+1)   -   -   -   -   -   -
23rd   6   6   5   5   5   5   4   4   4   4 (+1)   3   2   1 (+1)   -   -   -   -   -
24th   7 (+1)   6   5   5   5   5   5 (+1)   4   4   4   3   3 (+1)   2 (+1)   -   -   -   -   -
25th   7   6   5   5   5   5   5   5 (+1)   4   4   4 (+1)   3   2   1 (+1)   -   -   -   -

Cantrips (Valorous Tier)

A wizard knows every cantrip on the Wizard Spells list that falls within their chosen arcane school, their complimentary schools, or the universal school. They cannot ever learn any cantrips from any of the four opposition schools.

While the wizard may know many cantrips, they can only prepare a limited number of them each day, as shown on the Spells Preparable Per Day table (above).

Despite being limited in how many they can prepare each day, the wizard can cast these spells as frequently as they wish, without limit. Unlike spells of level 1 or higher, cantrips do not detach from the wizard's aura when cast. They can be 'swapped out' with a different cantrip during the wizard's nightly preparation of new spells, if desired, but otherwise, they remain available for casting by the wizard indefinitely.

Implement Bonus (Valorous Tier)

If you do not already have the Implement Bonus class feature, you gain it at 21st level. See Implement Bonus for details on how this works.

Mana Burning (Valorous Tier)

If you do not already have the Mana Burning class feature, you gain it at 21st level. See Mana Burning for details on how this works.

Powerful Cantrip III (Sp)

At 21st level, the wizard chooses one of the third level spells known to them. This spell becomes a cantrip for this wizard, and is thus not expended upon casting. The wizard must still prepare the spell, but it is prepared as though it were a 0th-level spell. (To be clear, this is in addition to the 1st level spell they know from Powerful Cantrip I, and the second level spell they know from Powerful Cantrip II, assuming they possess either or both of those class features as well) Despite this, the save DC of the spell chosen is calculated as though it were a 3rd level spell.

In addition, in place of the normal casting time listed for the spell selected as the wizard's powerful cantrip, the wizard may now cast that spell as a swift action, but only up to once per round, and only during rounds in which the wizard does not cast a Quickened spell. The powerful cantrip can always be cast at its normal casting time, if the wizard prefers. For example, if the spell normally requires a standard action to cast, the wizard can cast it as a standard action and as a swift action in the same round, if they wish. However, they could not then degrade their move action to a swift action and cast it a third time, since the swift action casting time can only be used once per round.

Each time the wizard gains a level, if they wish, they may change the spell they have chosen as their powerful cantrip, though it must still come their list of known 3rd-level spells. Spells from opposition schools may not be made into powerful cantrips. Powerful cantrips may not have metamagic feats applied to them, but they can be mana burned. They cannot be expended as a spell slot for mana burning other spells, however.

Bonus Feat VI (Ex)

At 22nd level, the wizard may select a bonus feat. The wizard may select any feat for which they meet the prerequisites at the time the feat is chosen. Wizards are advised, however, to consider at least some metamagic feats, in order to make use of their higher level spells slots, especially at higher levels.

High Magic IV (Sp)

If you do not already have the High Magic I class feature, you gain it at 24th level. See High Magic I for details on how this works.

If you have the High Magic I class feature, but you do not already have the High Magic II class feature, you gain it at 24th level, instead. See High Magic II for details on how this works.

If you already have the High Magic I and the High Magic II class features, but you do not already have the High Magic III class feature, you gain it at 24th level, instead. See High Magic III for details on how this works.

If you already have the High Magic I, High Magic II, and High Magic III class features from previous tiers of the Wizard class, they improve at 24th level, instead. High Magic IV allows the wizard to apply metamagic feats they know to their 1st through 8th level spells (instead of 1st through 6th level spells), and reduce the total spell level increase caused by those metamagic feats by 3, when doing so (instead of 2).

Example: If the wizard wants to apply the Empower Spell (+2 spell level increase) and Maximize Spell (+3 spell level increase) feats to a 1st level spell, they would normally increase the spell slot required to memorize that spell by +5, thus requiring a 6th-level spell slot to memorize this maximized, empowered 1st-level spell. With High Magic IV, the wizard can reduce this to only requiring a 3rd-level spell slot, instead.

High Magic only reduces the total spell level increase of all metamagic feats being applied to a 1st-, 2nd-, 3rd-, 4th-, 5th-, or 6th-level spell, not the spell level increase for each metamagic feat used. High Magic can reduce the spell level increase of metamagic down to zero, but it cannot reduce the base spell level of the spell.

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Mythic Wizard (Levels 26 - 30)

Level Full Attack BAB Saving Throws Base AC Class Features
1st Atk 2nd Atk 3rd Atk 4th Atk Fort Refl Will
26th   +13   +8   -   -   +9   +9   +15   9 (Wizard Spells), (Arcane School), (Implement Bonus), (Mana Burning), Magisterium, Bonus Feat VII
27th   +14 (+1)   +9 (+1)   -   -   +10 (+1)   +10 (+1)   +16 (+1)   9 Level 14 Spells
28th   +14   +9   -   -   +10   +10   +16   9 High Magic V
29th   +15 (+1)   +10 (+1)   -   -   +11 (+1)   +11 (+1)   +17 (+1)   9 Level 15 Spells
30th   +15   +10   -   -   +11   +11   +17   9 Bonus Feat VIII

Weapon and Armor Proficiency

Wizards are proficient with the Athame, Dagger, Light Crossbow, Heavy Crossbows, Light Mace, Sickle, and Mage's Staff, but not with any type of armor or shield.

Arcane Spells and Armor

Even the lightest of armors can interfere with the complicated gestures required while casting any spell that has a somatic component. The armor and shield descriptions list the arcane spell failure chance for different armors and shields.

If a spell doesn't have a somatic component, an arcane spellcaster can cast it with no arcane spell failure chance while wearing armor. Such spells can also be cast even if the caster's hands are bound or they are grappling (although Concentration checks may still be necessary). The metamagic feat Still Spell allows a spellcaster to prepare or cast a spell without the somatic component at one spell level higher than normal. This also provides a way to cast a spell while wearing armor without risking arcane spell failure.

Wizard Spells (Mythic Tier)

If you do not already have the Wizard Spells class feature, you gain it at 26th level. See Wizard Spells for details on how this works. You do not gain the 'Spells Preparable Per Day' amounts listed in previous tiers of the Wizard class unless you actually took those previous tiers.

Remember that you also receive bonus spells per day if you have a sufficiently high Intelligence score.

Arcane School (Mythic Tier)

If you have not already selected an Arcane School to specialize in, you must do so at 26th level. See Arcane School for details on how this works.

If you have already picked an Arcane School, you cannot change it, except through the re-selection process. (Note that, if the reselection process is used to change schools, any spells learned from schools that would become opposition schools under the new choice are lost. The wizard can replace up to one lost spell per wizard level the possess with a new spell of the same spell level as the one being lost, choosing from a school they now have access to. If the wizard loses more spells than the "one per wizard level" would replace, the extra spells are simply lost without replacement. Changes of this magnitude have consequences, and should not be undertaken without due consideration.)

Once chosen, the wizard may only learn, prepare, and cast spells from that specific school, from the two schools complementary to that school, and from the Universal school. Consequently, they may never learn spells from the four schools of magic that are in opposition to their chosen arcane school. Wizards receive no bonuses or penalties for casting spells from their primary school, complementary schools, or the Universal school. They are all cast with the same precision and ability as those from the primary school.

Spells Known (Mythic Tier)

Wizards perform a certain amount of spell research between adventures. Each time a character attains a new wizard level, they gain two spells of their choice to add to their spellbook. The two free spells must be of spell levels they can cast. At least one of the two free spells learned must come from the wizard's chosen primary arcane school.

Wizards cannot typically 'unlearn' a spell, once it is known (and knowing more spells is generally a very good thing for a wizard, even if a particular spell isn't especially useful to them). However, with GM's approval, a wizard can trade out up to one spell for free for another spell of equal spell level from a school they are allowed to learn, up to once per new wizard level gained.

Spells Preparable Per Day (Mythic Tier)

The following table shows how many spells the wizard can actually prepare and cast each day at this experience tier. As a wizard grows in power and level, their auras become stronger, their understanding of the fundamental forces of magic improves, and thus the wizard gains access to higher level spells, and the ability to prepare and cast more of them each day.

The wizard's base daily allotment of preparable spells is given in the table below. In addition, they receive bonus spells per day if they have a high Intelligence score (see Table: Bonus Spell Slots Per Day). When the wizard studies their spellbook and memorizes new spells each night during a full night's rest, it resets their available spells back to the number listed for each spell level in the table below, and also restores any bonus slots provided by having a high caster ability score. Unused prepared spells from previous days cannot be saved up and used later. Any prepared spells that the wizard fails to cast before the next time they prepare new spells, or before 24 hours pass (whichever comes first), are lost.

To prepare or cast a spell, a wizard must have an Intelligence score equal to at least 10 + the spell level.

The pluses in parentheses after some of the numbers in the table below indicate when the value has increased from the previous level (hereafter referred to as 'delta values'). Characters who are multi-classing only receive the delta values of each spell level, rather than the full amount listed (unless, of course, they are the same).

Level 0th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th
26th   7   7 (+1)   5   5   5   5   5   5   4   4   4   3   3 (+1)   2 (+1)   -   -   -   -
27th   7   7   6 (+1)   5   5   5   5   5   5 (+1)   4   4   4 (+1)   3   2   1 (+1)   -   -   -
28th   7   7   6   5   5   5   5   5   5   5 (+1)   4   4   3   3 (+1)   2 (+1)   -   -   -
29th   7   7   6   6 (+1)   5   5   5   5   5   5   4   4   4 (+1)   3   2   1 (+1)   -   -
30th   7   7   6   6   6 (+1)   5   5   5   5   5   5 (+1)   4   4   3   3 (+1)   2 (+1)   -   -

Cantrips (Mythic Tier)

A wizard knows every cantrip on the Wizard Spells list that falls within their chosen arcane school, their complimentary schools, or the universal school. They cannot ever learn any cantrips from any of the four opposition schools.

While the wizard may know many cantrips, they can only prepare a limited number of them each day, as shown on the Spells Preparable Per Day table (above).

Despite being limited in how many they can prepare each day, the wizard can cast these spells as frequently as they wish, without limit. Unlike spells of level 1 or higher, cantrips do not detach from the wizard's aura when cast. They can be 'swapped out' with a different cantrip during the wizard's nightly preparation of new spells, if desired, but otherwise, they remain available for casting by the wizard indefinitely.

Implement Bonus (Mythic Tier)

If you do not already have the Implement Bonus class feature, you gain it at 26th level. See Implement Bonus for details on how this works.

Mana Burning (Mythic Tier)

If you do not already have the Mana Burning class feature, you gain it at 26th level. See Mana Burning for details on how this works.

Magisterium (Su)

At 26th level, the wizard learns how to apply magic to themselves with a lighter touch, allowing it to stack with another magical effect with less interference. Upon gaining this class feature, the wizard chooses one spell they can cast on themselves that normally lays an Arcane Charge. That spell no longer lays an Arcane Charge when the wizard casts it upon themselves. This allows the wizard to have this spell present on themselves and still accept a different spell that lays an Arcane Charge without having to choose which of the two effects they want to keep.

A spell designated as the wizard's Magisterium spell cannot be modified with metamagic, nor can it be mana burned. The exception to this rule is when a wizard creates a permanently modified version of a spell through the Spell Research process. Such a spell, which now natively includes one or more metamagic effects, is treated as a 'base spell' for purposes of Magisterium.

The Arcane Charge that the wizard's Magisterium spell normally applies is only ignored when it is cast by the wizard on themselves; if the wizard casts the spell on anyone else, it still lays an Arcane Charge as normal.

Bonus Feat VII (Ex)

At 26th level, the wizard may select a bonus feat. The wizard may select any feat for which they meet the prerequisites at the time the feat is chosen. Wizards are advised, however, to consider at least some metamagic feats, in order to make use of their higher level spells slots, especially at higher levels.

High Magic V (Sp)

If you do not already have the High Magic I class feature, you gain it at 28th level. See High Magic I for details on how this works.

If you have the High Magic I class feature, but you do not already have the High Magic II class feature, you gain it at 28th level, instead. See High Magic II for details on how this works.

If you already have the High Magic I and the High Magic II class features, but you do not already have the High Magic III class feature, you gain it at 28th level, instead. See High Magic III for details on how this works.

If you already have the High Magic I, High Magic II, and High Magic III class features, but you do not already have the High Magic IV class feature, you gain it at 28th level, instead. See High Magic IV for details on how this works.

If you already have the High Magic I through High Magic IV class features from previous tiers of the Wizard class, they improve at 28th level, instead. High Magic III allows the wizard to apply the metamagic level increase reduction of High Magic to any of their 1st through 9th level spells, or any of their 10th level true dweomers (instead of 1st through 8th level spells). High Magic V still reduces the total spell level increase caused by metamagic feats by 3, when doing so (just as High Magic IV did).

Example: If the wizard wants to apply the Empower Spell (+2 spell level increase) and Maximize Spell (+3 spell level increase) feats to a 1st-level spell, they would normally increase the spell slot required to memorize that spell by +5, thus requiring a 6th-level spell slot to memorize this maximized, empowered 1st-level spell. With High Magic V, the wizard can reduce this to only requiring a 3rd-level spell slot, instead.

High Magic only reduces the total spell level increase of all metamagic feats being applied to a spell, not the spell level increase for each metamagic feat used. High Magic can reduce the spell level increase of metamagic down to zero, but it cannot reduce the base spell level of the spell.

Bonus Feat VIII (Ex)

At 30th level, the wizard may select a bonus feat. The wizard may select any feat for which they meet the prerequisites at the time the feat is chosen. Wizards are advised, however, to consider at least some metamagic feats, in order to make use of their higher level spells slots, especially at higher levels.

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Legendary Wizard (Levels 31 - 35)

Level Full Attack BAB Saving Throws Base AC Class Features
1st Atk 2nd Atk 3rd Atk 4th Atk Fort Refl Will
31st   +16 (+1)   +11 (+1)   -   -   +12 (+1)   +12 (+1)   +18 (+1)   9 (Wizard Spells), (Arcane School), (Implement Bonus), (Mana Burning), Level 16 Spells, Powerful Cantrip IV
32nd   +16   +11   -   -   +12   +12   +18   9 High Magic VI
33rd   +17 (+1)   +12 (+1)   -   -   +13 (+1)   +13 (+1)   +19 (+1)   9 Level 17 Spells
34th   +17   +12   -   -   +13   +13   +19   9 Bonus Feat IX
35th   +18 (+1)   +13 (+1)   -   -   +14 (+1)   +14 (+1)   +20 (+1)   9 High Magic VII

Weapon and Armor Proficiency

Wizards are proficient with the Athame, Dagger, Light Crossbow, Heavy Crossbows, Light Mace, Sickle, and Mage's Staff, but not with any type of armor or shield.

Arcane Spells and Armor

Even the lightest of armors can interfere with the complicated gestures required while casting any spell that has a somatic component. The armor and shield descriptions list the arcane spell failure chance for different armors and shields.

If a spell doesn't have a somatic component, an arcane spellcaster can cast it with no arcane spell failure chance while wearing armor. Such spells can also be cast even if the caster's hands are bound or they are grappling (although Concentration checks may still be necessary). The metamagic feat Still Spell allows a spellcaster to prepare or cast a spell without the somatic component at one spell level higher than normal. This also provides a way to cast a spell while wearing armor without risking arcane spell failure.

Wizard Spells (Legendary Tier)

If you do not already have the Wizard Spells class feature, you gain it at 31st level. See Wizard Spells for details on how this works. You do not gain the 'Spells Preparable Per Day' amounts listed in previous tiers of the Wizard class unless you actually took those previous tiers.

Remember that you also receive bonus spells per day if you have a sufficiently high Intelligence score.

Arcane School (Legendary Tier)

If you have not already selected an Arcane School to specialize in, you must do so at 31st level. See Arcane School for details on how this works.

If you have already picked an Arcane School, you cannot change it, except through the re-selection process. (Note that, if the reselection process is used to change schools, any spells learned from schools that would become opposition schools under the new choice are lost. The wizard can replace up to one lost spell per wizard level the possess with a new spell of the same spell level as the one being lost, choosing from a school they now have access to. If the wizard loses more spells than the "one per wizard level" would replace, the extra spells are simply lost without replacement. Changes of this magnitude have consequences, and should not be undertaken without due consideration.)

Once chosen, the wizard may only learn, prepare, and cast spells from that specific school, from the two schools complementary to that school, and from the Universal school. Consequently, they may never learn spells from the four schools of magic that are in opposition to their chosen arcane school. Wizards receive no bonuses or penalties for casting spells from their primary school, complementary schools, or the Universal school. They are all cast with the same precision and ability as those from the primary school.

Spells Known (Legendary Tier)

Wizards perform a certain amount of spell research between adventures. Each time a character attains a new wizard level, they gain two spells of their choice to add to their spellbook. The two free spells must be of spell levels they can cast. At least one of the two free spells learned must come from the wizard's chosen primary arcane school.

Wizards cannot typically 'unlearn' a spell, once it is known (and knowing more spells is generally a very good thing for a wizard, even if a particular spell isn't especially useful to them). However, with GM's approval, a wizard can trade out up to one spell for free for another spell of equal spell level from a school they are allowed to learn, up to once per new wizard level gained.

Spells Preparable Per Day (Legendary Tier)

The following table shows how many spells the wizard can actually prepare and cast each day at this experience tier. As a wizard grows in power and level, their auras become stronger, their understanding of the fundamental forces of magic improves, and thus the wizard gains access to higher level spells, and the ability to prepare and cast more of them each day.

The wizard's base daily allotment of preparable spells is given in the table below. In addition, they receive bonus spells per day if they have a high Intelligence score (see Table: Bonus Spell Slots Per Day). When the wizard studies their spellbook and memorizes new spells each night during a full night's rest, it resets their available spells back to the number listed for each spell level in the table below, and also restores any bonus slots provided by having a high caster ability score. Unused prepared spells from previous days cannot be saved up and used later. Any prepared spells that the wizard fails to cast before the next time they prepare new spells, or before 24 hours pass (whichever comes first), are lost.

To prepare or cast a spell, a wizard must have an Intelligence score equal to at least 10 + the spell level.

The pluses in parentheses after some of the numbers in the table below indicate when the value has increased from the previous level (hereafter referred to as 'delta values'). Characters who are multi-classing only receive the delta values of each spell level, rather than the full amount listed (unless, of course, they are the same).

Level 0th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th
31st   7   7   6   6   6   5   5   5   5   5   5   5 (+1)   4   4 (+1)   3   2   1 (+1)   -
32nd   7   7   6   6   6   6 (+1)   5   5   5   5   5   5   4   4   3   3 (+1)   2 (+1)   -
33rd   7   7   6   6   6   6   6 (+1)   5   5   5   5   5   5 (+1)   4   4 (+1)   3   2   1 (+1)
34th   7   7   6   6   6   6   6   5   5   5   5   5   5   5 (+1)   4   3   3 (+1)   2 (+1)
35th   7   7   6   6   6   6   6   6 (+1)   5   5   5   5   5   5   4   4 (+1)   3   3 (+1)

Cantrips (Legendary Tier)

A wizard knows every cantrip on the Wizard Spells list that falls within their chosen arcane school, their complimentary schools, or the universal school. They cannot ever learn any cantrips from any of the four opposition schools.

While the wizard may know many cantrips, they can only prepare a limited number of them each day, as shown on the Spells Preparable Per Day table (above).

Despite being limited in how many they can prepare each day, the wizard can cast these spells as frequently as they wish, without limit. Unlike spells of level 1 or higher, cantrips do not detach from the wizard's aura when cast. They can be 'swapped out' with a different cantrip during the wizard's nightly preparation of new spells, if desired, but otherwise, they remain available for casting by the wizard indefinitely.

Implement Bonus (Legendary Tier)

If you do not already have the Implement Bonus class feature, you gain it at 31st level. See Implement Bonus for details on how this works.

Mana Burning (Legendary Tier)

If you do not already have the Mana Burning class feature, you gain it at 31st level. See Mana Burning for details on how this works.

Powerful Cantrip IV (Sp)

At 31st level, the wizard chooses one of the fourth level spells known to them. This spell becomes a cantrip for this wizard, and is thus not expended upon casting. The wizard must still prepare the spell, but it is prepared as though it were a 0th-level spell. (To be clear, this is in addition to the 1st level spell they know from Powerful Cantrip I, the second level spell they know from Powerful Cantrip II, and the third level spell they know from Powerful Cantrip III, assuming they possess any or all of those class features as well) Despite this, the save DC of the spell chosen is calculated as though it were a 4th level spell.

In addition, in place of the normal casting time listed for the spell selected as the wizard's powerful cantrip, the wizard may now cast that spell as a swift action, but only up to once per round, and only during rounds in which the wizard does not cast a Quickened spell. The powerful cantrip can always be cast at its normal casting time, if the wizard prefers. For example, if the spell normally requires a standard action to cast, the wizard can cast it as a standard action and as a swift action in the same round, if they wish. However, they could not then degrade their move action to a swift action and cast it a third time, since the swift action casting time can only be used once per round.

Each time the wizard gains a level, if they wish, they may change the spell they have chosen as their powerful cantrip, though it must still come their list of known 4th-level spells. Spells from opposition schools may not be made into powerful cantrips. Powerful cantrips may not have metamagic feats applied to them, but they can be mana burned. They cannot be expended as a spell slot for mana burning other spells, however.

High Magic VI (Sp)

If you do not already have the High Magic I class feature, you gain it at 32nd level. See High Magic I for details on how this works.

If you have the High Magic I class feature, but you do not already have the High Magic II class feature, you gain it at 32nd level, instead. See High Magic II for details on how this works.

If you already have the High Magic I and the High Magic II class features, but you do not already have the High Magic III class feature, you gain it at 32nd level, instead. See High Magic III for details on how this works.

If you already have the High Magic I, High Magic II, and High Magic III class features, but you do not already have the High Magic IV class feature, you gain it at 32nd level, instead. See High Magic IV for details on how this works.

If you already have the High Magic I through High Magic IV class features, but you do not already have the High Magic V class feature, you gain it at 32nd level, instead. See High Magic V for details on how this works.

If you already have the High Magic I through High Magic V class features from previous tiers of the Wizard class, they improve at 32nd level, instead. High Magic VI allows the wizard to apply metamagic feats they know to any of their 1st through 9th level spells or any of their 10th through 12th level true dweomers (instead of 1st through 9th level spells, and 10th level true dweomers), and reduce the total spell level increase caused by those metamagic feats by 4, when doing so (instead of 3).

Example: If the wizard wants to apply the Empower Spell (+2 spell level increase) and Maximize Spell (+3 spell level increase) feats to a 1st-level spell, they would normally increase the spell slot required to memorize that spell by +5, thus requiring a 6th-level spell slot to memorize this maximized, empowered 1st-level spell. With High Magic VI, the wizard can reduce this to only requiring a 2nd-level spell slot, instead.

High Magic only reduces the total spell level increase of all metamagic feats being applied to a spell, not the spell level increase for each metamagic feat used. High Magic can reduce the spell level increase of metamagic down to zero, but it cannot reduce the base spell level of the spell.

Bonus Feat IX (Ex)

At 34th level, the wizard may select a bonus feat. The wizard may select any feat for which they meet the prerequisites at the time the feat is chosen. Wizards are advised, however, to consider at least some metamagic feats, in order to make use of their higher level spells slots, especially at higher levels.

High Magic VII (Sp)

If you do not already have the High Magic I class feature, you gain it at 35th level. See High Magic I for details on how this works.

If you have the High Magic I class feature, but you do not already have the High Magic II class feature, you gain it at 35th level, instead. See High Magic II for details on how this works.

If you already have the High Magic I and the High Magic II class features, but you do not already have the High Magic III class feature, you gain it at 35th level, instead. See High Magic III for details on how this works.

If you already have the High Magic I, High Magic II, and High Magic III class features, but you do not already have the High Magic IV class feature, you gain it at 35th level, instead. See High Magic IV for details on how this works.

If you already have the High Magic I through High Magic IV class features, but you do not already have the High Magic V class feature, you gain it at 35th level, instead. See High Magic V for details on how this works.

If you already have the High Magic I through High Magic V class features, but you do not already have the High Magic VI class feature, you gain it at 35th level, instead. See High Magic VI for details on how this works.

If you already have the High Magic I through High Magic VI class features from previous tiers of the Wizard class, they improve at 35th level, instead. High Magic VII allows the wizard to apply metamagic feats they know to any spell or true dweomer they possess (instead of 1st through 9th level spells, and 10th through 12th level true dweomers), and reduce the total spell level increase caused by those metamagic feats by 5, when doing so (instead of 4).

Example: If the wizard wants to apply the Empower Spell (+2 spell level increase) and Maximize Spell (+3 spell level increase) feats to a 1st-level spell, they would normally increase the spell slot required to memorize that spell by +5, thus requiring a 6th-level spell slot to memorize this maximized, empowered 1st-level spell. With High Magic VII, the wizard can reduce this to only requiring a 1st-level spell slot, instead.

High Magic only reduces the total spell level increase of all metamagic feats being applied to a spell, not the spell level increase for each metamagic feat used. High Magic can reduce the spell level increase of metamagic down to zero, but it cannot reduce the base spell level of the spell.

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Apotheotic Wizard (Levels 36+)

Level Class Features
36+ Apotheosis!

Apotheosis!

Upon reaching level 36, and at every level above that, the character begins to gather their mantle of divinity around themselves. This can take many forms, but it is the first step to the ascension to godhood.

Reaching apotheosis is usually signified by a paradigm shift in the campaign. Traditional adventuring, such as fighting monsters and looting treasure, is largely beneath the dignity and power of such advanced creatures. Instead, they compete within the powers and intrigues of the Celestial Bureaucracy itself, gathering power, followers, allies, and potens machenvar to seize their places of power. Apotheotic creatures usually choose a theme around which their powers are centered, and use this theme as a common belief to gather their followers (or worshipers).

GMs are encouraged to completely break the rules, remove limitations and restrictions, and generally experiment with the extreme limits of power that this level of play offers. Characters are of a power level comparable to the most extreme super-heroes of comics and film, and can perform feats well beyond anything a mortal could ever dream. GMs are cautioned that games at this level can be very difficult to run, and presenting challenges for apotheotic characters can be a very daunting task. However, if you can pull it off, it's likely that your players will talk about how insane and awesome your campaign was for years after it ends.