Sleight of Hand

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Description

Ability Score Used: Dexterity
Armor Check Penalty Applies? Yes


Sleight of Hand is the ability to use your fingers and toes with uncanny precision, flexibility and skill. You can curl and bend your digits in ways that seem impossible to the observer, and as a result, you can do things right under the noses of people without them ever being the wiser.

Your training allows you to pick pockets, draw hidden weapons, and take a variety of actions without being noticed.

This skill is subject to Environmental Effects.

As with all skills, the uses below are merely suggestions, and by no means the full gamut of possible ways a skill can be used. Players and GM's are encouraged to find additional ways to use each skill.


Conceal Object

You can use sleight of hand to palm a small, unattended object and secret it upon your person. Sleight of hand may not be used to camouflage an object in place (that is the domain of Disguise). This can only be done on unattended objects, or objects already on your person, outside of combat. Attended objects require the Shoplifting skill use of sleight of hand. In-combat pilfering requires the use of the Steal combat maneuver.

You can use conceal object to perform minor feats of legerdemain, such as making a coin disappear even while someone watches you do it. Of course, they might still be mad that you took their coin, despite not knowing where the heck it went.

You can use conceal object to hide a light weapon or a weapon with Concealable (Quality) on your body.

Your Sleight of Hand check is opposed by the Perception check of anyone observing you or of anyone frisking you. In the latter case, the searcher gains a +4 bonus on the Perception check, since it's generally easier to find such an object than to hide it. A dagger is easier to hide than most light weapons, and grants you a +2 bonus on your Sleight of Hand check to conceal it. An extraordinarily small object, such as a coin, shuriken, or ring, grants you a +4 bonus on your Sleight of Hand check to conceal it, and heavy or baggy clothing (such as a cloak) grants you a +2 bonus on the check.

Action Required:

Move action, or part of a move action.

If you have Quick Draw (Feat), conceal object may be performed as a swift action.

DC of Check:

15, or the Perception result of someone observing or searching you, whichever is higher.

Modifiers to Check
  • Alert: If you are attempting the check on someone who is on the lookout for trouble, or suspicious of you, the DC is increased by +5.
  • Almost Out of Reach: If the object you want to swipe is hard for you to reach without looking like you're reaching, the DC is increased by +2.
  • Under the Counter: If the object is behind something else, under the counter, in a closed (but not locked -- that's Disable Device) cabinet, the DC is increased by +4.
  • Too Many Eyes: For each non-friendly creature who can see you after the first, the DC is increased by +1.
  • Frisking: If someone is patting you down to look for hidden weapons, the DC is increased by +4.
  • Baggy Clothes: If you are wearing a cloak or baggy clothing, suitable for stuffing loot into, the DC is reduced by -2.
Take 10? / Take 20?

You can take 10, but you cannot take 20.

Allows Assists?

No

Results of Success

You successfully conceal the object somewhere on your person, without anyone knowing you have done so.

Consequences of Failure

You are spotted stuffing the object into your clothes.

Retry Allowed?

No

Provokes AOO?

No

Dirty Trick

Dirty Trick is a combat maneuver. You can never perform more than one combat maneuver per round, even if you have sufficient actions to do so. The only exception to this is spending an action point, where that action point grants you an action sufficient to perform another maneuver, in which case a second maneuver in the same round is permitted.

This maneuver covers any sort of situational attack that imposes a penalty on a foe for a short period of time. Examples include kicking sand into an opponent's face, pulling down an enemy's pants around their ankles, or hitting a foe in a sensitive spot.

The GM is the arbiter of what can be accomplished with this maneuver, but it cannot be used to impose a permanent penalty, and the results can be undone if the target spends a move action. The normal result is the target takes the hindered condition.

Action Required:

Attack Action (i.e. as a standard action, or in place of any attack during a full attack action).

DC of Check:

Target creature's Maneuver Defense

Modifiers to Check

A Dirty Trick may only be attempted against an adjacent creature. If you have a reach weapon or any other method of extending your combat reach, this does not extend the range of Dirty Trick.

Take 10? / Take 20?

No

Allows Assists?

No

Results of Success

If your combat maneuver result equals or exceeds the target's Maneuver Defense, the target normally gains the hindered condition. The GM may rule there are different results in specific situations, usually based on how hard they are laughing at the player's madcap antics.

The Hindered condition lasts until the start of your next turn. For every 5 by which your attack exceeds your opponent's Maneuver Defense, the penalty lasts 1 additional round. If the target expends a move action, the condition is cleared, regardless of the remaining duration.

In addition to the special effects of the chosen maneuver, you may also deal damage to the creature equal to the base weapon damage of the weapon you are wielding, not including any adders (such as enhancement bonuses, STR modifiers, feats, spell effects, precision damage, bonus damage, etc). Note that base weapon damage increases at 6th, 11th, 16th, 21st, 26th, and 31st levels, which also improves the damage done by maneuvers. If you want to do more damage with a combat maneuver, you can take feats to improve your combat maneuvers, or use weapons which are good at certain combat maneuvers.

The type of damage dealt is the same type as is dealt by the weapon you are wielding. If your weapon deals more than one type of damage, you can choose which type of damage (from among those types) is inflicted by the maneuver.

If you have natural or class-based non-weapon attacks, you may roll just the dice you would normally roll for an attack you are allowed to make during an attack of opportunity, not including any adders (such as enhancement bonuses, STR modifiers, feats, spell effects, precision damage, bonus damage, etc).

You may always choose not to deal any damage with a combat maneuver, if you prefer.

Example: a 3rd level fighter would roll just the dice from their +1 longsword (1d8), while a 3rd level Monk would roll just the dice of their Echoing Strike attack (2d8), and a 3rd level Brawler would roll just the dice of their Cross attack (also 2d8).
Consequences of Failure

There is no effect, and you often look vaguely foolish.

Retry Allowed?

Yes

Provokes AOO?

No

Disarm

Disarm is a combat maneuver. You can never perform more than one combat maneuver per round, even if you have sufficient actions to do so. The only exception to this is spending an action point, where that action point grants you an action sufficient to perform another maneuver, in which case a second maneuver in the same round is permitted.

You can attempt to disarm any creature, even a creature that is only using natural weapons (such as claws or fists). If the disarm attempt is successful, the target creature drops its held weapon, or, if it isn't wielding a weapon, it suffers a penalty to its attacks until it expends a move action to re-combobulate itself. A Disarm can be attempted against any creature you threaten.

Action Required:

Attack Action (i.e. as a standard action, or in place of any attack during a full attack action).

DC of Check:

Target creature's Maneuver Defense

Modifiers to Check

-

Take 10? / Take 20?

No

Allows Assists?

No

Results of Success

If your combat maneuver attack is successful, your target drops one item it is wielding of your choice (even if the item is wielded with two hands).

If your attack exceeds the Maneuver Defense of the target by 10 or more, the target drops the items it is carrying in both hands (maximum two items if the target has more than two hands). Yes, you can knock both the sword AND the shield out of a foe's hands.

A successfully disarmed weapon, or weapons, always fall into the square of the creature from which they were disarmed. Retrieving an item from the ground is a move action. Note that some feats allow disarmed weapons to be moved to other squares, in which case the disarmed creature must first move to the square in question to retrieve it.

When a player character is disarmed, they may not make attacks with the disarmed weapon until they either retrieve it (using a move action) or draw a different weapon with which to attack.

When a Monster write-up indicates that they use a weapon to attack, they may expend a move action to retrieve the weapon and attack normally. If they cannot retrieve the weapon, they may still make attacks at -2 to hit, but when they hit, they do not roll their damage, instead inflicting only the bonus to their damage dice (e.g. a creature that normally deals 3d6+11 would only deal 11 points of damage). Any special conditions and effects are adjudicated by the referee on a case-by-case basis.

When a Monster write-up indicates that they use natural weapons (claw, claw, bite) to attack, Disarm may still be used against the creature. A successful Disarm Maneuver knocks the creature off-balance, twists their appendages into each other, confuses them, or otherwise hampers their ability to attack. Exactly as monsters using a weapon, a natural weapons-user who is disarmed may still make attacks at -2 to hit, but when they hit, they they do not roll their damage, instead inflicting only the bonus to their damage dice (e.g. a creature that normally deals 3d6+11 would only deal 11 points of damage). Any special conditions and effects are adjudicated by the referee on a case-by-case basis. The creature may expend a move action to reorient itself and get rid of this penalty. These same rules apply to brawlers, monks and other player-characters who fight without weapons that are disarmed.

In addition to the special effects of the chosen maneuver, you may also deal damage to the creature equal to the base weapon damage of the weapon you are wielding, not including any adders (such as enhancement bonuses, STR modifiers, feats, spell effects, precision damage, bonus damage, etc). Note that base weapon damage increases at 6th, 11th, 16th, 21st, 26th, and 31st levels, which also improves the damage done by maneuvers. If you want to do more damage with a combat maneuver, you can take feats to improve your combat maneuvers, or use weapons which are good at certain combat maneuvers.

The type of damage dealt is the same type as is dealt by the weapon you are wielding. If your weapon deals more than one type of damage, you can choose which type of damage (from among those types) is inflicted by the maneuver.

If you have natural or class-based non-weapon attacks, you may roll just the dice you would normally roll for an attack you are allowed to make during an attack of opportunity, not including any adders (such as enhancement bonuses, STR modifiers, feats, spell effects, precision damage, bonus damage, etc).

You may always choose not to deal any damage with a combat maneuver, if you prefer.

Example: a 3rd level fighter would roll just the dice from their +1 longsword (1d8), while a 3rd level Monk would roll just the dice of their Echoing Strike attack (2d8), and a 3rd level Brawler would roll just the dice of their Cross attack (also 2d8).
Consequences of Failure

You are unable to disarm or discombobulate your foe.

Retry Allowed?

Yes

Provokes AOO?

No

Reposition

Reposition is a combat maneuver. You can never perform more than one combat maneuver per round, even if you have sufficient actions to do so. The only exception to this is spending an action point, where that action point grants you an action sufficient to perform another maneuver, in which case a second maneuver in the same round is permitted.

A reposition attempts to force a foe to move to a different space in relation to your location. You do not move from your starting square during a reposition attempt.

Reposition attempts may be made against any creature you threaten, as long as that creature is no more than one size category larger than you.

Reposition is considered forced movement. You can use this maneuver to move a foe into a space that is intrinsically dangerous, such as off a cliff or into a Pillar of Fire, but it may fall Prone to stop its forced movement in all cases. An enemy being moved by a reposition does not provoke an attack of opportunity for leaving threatened squares.

You cannot move a creature into a square that is occupied by a solid object or obstacle.

Action Required:

Attack Action (i.e. as a standard action, or in place of any attack during a full attack action).

DC of Check:

The target's Maneuver Defense

Modifiers to Check

-

Take 10? / Take 20?

No

Allows Assists?

No

Results of Success

If your Sleight of Hand check is successful, you may Slide your target 5 feet (1 square) to a new location.

For every 5 by which your attack exceeds your opponent's Maneuver Defense, you can move the target an additional 5 feet.

The target must remain within your reach at all times during this movement, except for the final 5 feet of movement, which can be to a space adjacent to your reach.

In addition to the special effects of the chosen maneuver, you may also deal damage to the creature equal to the base weapon damage of the weapon you are wielding, not including any adders (such as enhancement bonuses, STR modifiers, feats, spell effects, precision damage, bonus damage, etc). Note that base weapon damage increases at 6th, 11th, 16th, 21st, 26th, and 31st levels, which also improves the damage done by maneuvers. If you want to do more damage with a combat maneuver, you can take feats to improve your combat maneuvers, or use weapons which are good at certain combat maneuvers.

The type of damage dealt is the same type as is dealt by the weapon you are wielding. If your weapon deals more than one type of damage, you can choose which type of damage (from among those types) is inflicted by the maneuver.

If you have natural or class-based non-weapon attacks, you may roll just the dice you would normally roll for an attack you are allowed to make during an attack of opportunity, not including any adders (such as enhancement bonuses, STR modifiers, feats, spell effects, precision damage, bonus damage, etc).

You may always choose not to deal any damage with a combat maneuver, if you prefer.

Example: a 3rd level fighter would roll just the dice from their +1 longsword (1d8), while a 3rd level Monk would roll just the dice of their Echoing Strike attack (2d8), and a 3rd level Brawler would roll just the dice of their Cross attack (also 2d8).
Consequences of Failure

The target is not moved from its space.

Retry Allowed?

Yes

Provokes AOO?

No

Steal

Steal is a combat maneuver. You can never perform more than one combat maneuver per round, even if you have sufficient actions to do so. The only exception to this is spending an action point, where that action point grants you an action sufficient to perform another maneuver, in which case a second maneuver in the same round is permitted.

When you make a Steal combat maneuver, you attempt to remove an object from an enemy. This maneuver can be used in melee to steal any item that is neither held nor hidden in a bag or pack.

  • You can only steal from an enemy that actually uses equipment. Tyrannosauruses and swarms of spiders almost certainly don't have anything to steal. Even though most monsters have no defined equipment, they can be stolen from, as long as they are civilized enough that equipment use is likely. The GM has final say over whether a monster has anything valuable enough to steal.
  • You must have at least one hand free (holding nothing) to attempt this maneuver. The Steal attempt is made with that empty hand.
  • If you have a weapon with the Pilfering quality, you may make a Steal attempt with that hand as if it were empty.
  • Even if your weapon has reach, you must still be adjacent to your target to use the Steal maneuver.
  • If your attack is successful, you may take one item from your opponent. You must be able to reach the item to be taken (subject to GM discretion).
Action Required:

Attack Action (i.e. as a standard action, or in place of any attack during a full attack action).

DC of Check:

The Maneuver Defense of the enemy creature.

Modifiers to Check
  • Items that are loosely attached (such as items tucked into a belt, potions in a bandoleer, hats, brooches or necklaces) are the easiest to take, imposing no penalty.
  • Items fastened to a foe (such as cloaks, sheathed weapons, or pouches) are more difficult to take, and impose a -5 penalty to the check.
  • Items that are closely worn (such as armor, backpacks, boots, clothing, or rings) cannot be taken with this maneuver.
  • Items held in the hands (such as wielded weapons or wands) also cannot be taken with the steal maneuver-you must use the disarm combat maneuver instead. The GM is the final arbiter of what items can be taken.
  • Creatures that use natural attacks or have an intelligence of less than 6 frequently lack any specific items or equipment worth stealing.
  • If a monster uses a Steal maneuver against a player character, the monster chooses one of the character's visible items to target, determines whether it is "loosely attached" (no penalty), or "fastened" (-5 penalty), and makes his Maneuver Offense check against the player's Maneuver Defense. If successful, the creature steals that object from the player, and the player loses any benefits provided by that item until it is recovered.
  • Stealthy Thief: You can attempt to steal an item from a creature (during combat) without it noticing, by accepting a -10 penalty to the check. If you elect not to inflict any damage with this maneuver (you must declare this before you roll the check), this penalty is reduced to -5. Regardless, the creature might realize it was robbed if you take an item it feels is important enough to check on, periodically. However, it won't be immediately aware that it was taken, nor will it know who took it (though it can guess).
Take 10? / Take 20?

No

Allows Assists?

No

Results of Success

If the creature possessed a specific item that is eligible for the Steal maneuver, the player character is now holding that item (subject to weight limits, etc) in their previously-empty hand. It may now be treated as all held items, dropped as a free action, stowed away, etc.

  • In cases where no items are defined for the creature, but the creature would logically use equipment, the player gains a random amount of the creature's treasure value (1d10% of the creature's treasure value) immediately in the form of a small item, such as a gem or piece of jewelry. This amount increases to 1d10+10% if the player attempts to Steal an item that is fastened (suffering the -5 penalty to do so). This action does not reduce the amount of treasure it drops if it is defeated.
  • The steal maneuver can only be performed successfully on a given creature once per round. After that, it provides no benefit other than to inflict more damage.

Recovering stolen items:

  • Stolen items can be recovered by rendering the stealing character helpless, unconscious, or dead, and then expending a move action to retrieve the item. Stolen items can also be recovered by attempting a Steal maneuver against the stealing character to try to recover the lost items.
  • The target is always immediately aware of this theft unless you included the Stealthy Thief penalty in your check, described in the "Modifiers" section above.

In addition to the special effects of the chosen maneuver, you may also deal damage to the creature equal to the base weapon damage of the weapon you are wielding, not including any adders (such as enhancement bonuses, STR modifiers, feats, spell effects, precision damage, bonus damage, etc). Note that base weapon damage increases at 6th, 11th, 16th, 21st, 26th, and 31st levels, which also improves the damage done by maneuvers. If you want to do more damage with a combat maneuver, you can take feats to improve your combat maneuvers, or use weapons which are good at certain combat maneuvers.

The type of damage dealt is the same type as is dealt by the weapon you are wielding. If your weapon deals more than one type of damage, you can choose which type of damage (from among those types) is inflicted by the maneuver.

If you have natural or class-based non-weapon attacks, you may roll just the dice you would normally roll for an attack you are allowed to make during an attack of opportunity, not including any adders (such as enhancement bonuses, STR modifiers, feats, spell effects, precision damage, bonus damage, etc).

You may always choose not to deal any damage with a combat maneuver, if you prefer.

Example: a 3rd level fighter would roll just the dice from their +1 longsword (1d8), while a 3rd level Monk would roll just the dice of their Echoing Strike attack (2d8), and a 3rd level Brawler would roll just the dice of their Cross attack (also 2d8).
Consequences of Failure

The Steal maneuver fails and you get nothing.

Retry Allowed?

Yes

Provokes AOO?

No

Pick Pockets

You can use sleight of hand to try to take a small object from a creature out of combat. (Inside of combat, you must use the Steal combat maneuver.) If you succeed on this check, you take an item (a wallet or purse, dagger, wand, etc) as if you had succeeded on a Steal combat maneuver against them.

Just as with the Steal combat maneuver, you may only attempt to pilfer an object which is loosely attached (such as items tucked into a belt, potions in a bandoleer, hats, brooches or necklaces) or fastened (such as cloaks, sheathed weapons, or pouches) to the target. Items which are closely worn (such as armor, backpacks, boots, clothing, or rings), or being wielded/held in the target's hands may not be stolen with pick pockets.

Action Required:

Standard action

DC of Check:

Opposed by the target's Perception check.

Modifiers to Check
  • Alert: If you are attempting the check on someone who is on the lookout for trouble, or suspicious of you, the DC is increased by +5.
  • Inconvenient: If you are attempting the check on someone who is inconveniently placed, the DC is increased. Some examples are: Sitting down, +2, standing behind a counter, +4, sitting at a table or desk, +5, behind a peephole or murder hole, +20.
  • Loosely Attached: Attempting to pick an item which is only loosely attached to the target (such as items tucked into a belt, potions in a bandoleer, hats, brooches or necklaces) do not alter the DC.
  • Fastened: Attempting to pick an item which is fastened to the target (such as cloaks, sheathed weapons, or pouches) increase the DC by +5.
  • Witty Buildup: If your role-playing prior to your duplicitous assault was particularly entertaining, the GM may reduce the DC by anywhere from -2 (for pretty good role-playing) to -10 (for crazy, over-the-top role-playing you'll be talking about years from now).
  • Too Many Eyes: For each non-friendly creature who can see you (not including the target), the DC is increased by +1.
  • Light Weapons and Bucklers: Attempting to plant a light weapon and/or a buckler (or something of comparable size) increases the DC by +5.
  • One-Handed Weapons and Light Shields: Attempting to plant a one-handed weapon and/or a light shield (or something of comparable size) increases the DC by +15.
Take 10? / Take 20?

No

Allows Assists?

Yes (up to 5 allies). Assisting allies must have ranks in sleight of hand.

Results of Success

You successfully take the object from the target without their notice.

Consequences of Failure

If you fail by 4 or less, you are unable to take the item, but the target isn't sure that you were trying to rob them. They become alert (see modifiers, above) to any future attempts.

If you fail by 5 or more, or roll a natural 1 on the die, you successfully steal the object, but are noticed by the target. You are caught red-handed!

Retry Allowed?

If the target remains unaware of your intentions, you may try again next round.

Provokes AOO?

No

Subdue

Subdue is a combat maneuver. You can never perform more than one combat maneuver per round, even if you have sufficient actions to do so. The only exception to this is spending an action point, where that action point grants you an action sufficient to perform another maneuver, in which case a second maneuver in the same round is permitted.

You can employ non-lethal tactics to attempt to take down an enemy without killing them. Many times, this is done by smashing a beer mug over someone's head, or smashing a bar stool over their back, but it can also be done with an uppercut to the jaw, or a hard smack with the flat of your blade.

Creatures immune to critical hits or with no discernible anatomy are also immune to this combat maneuver.

Action Required:

Attack Action (i.e. as a standard action, or in place of any attack during a full attack action).

DC of Check:

The target's Maneuver Defense

Modifiers to Check

-

Take 10? / Take 20?

No

Allows Assists?

No

Results of Success

If you equal or exceed your target's Maneuver Defense by 4 or less, you inflict the Secured condition on the target. This condition lasts until the start of your next turn.

If you beat your target's Maneuver Defense by 5 or more, you inflict the Subdued condition on the target instead. This condition lasts until the start of your next turn.

In addition to the special effects of the chosen maneuver, you may also deal damage to the creature equal to the base weapon damage of the weapon you are wielding, not including any adders (such as enhancement bonuses, STR modifiers, feats, spell effects, precision damage, bonus damage, etc). Note that base weapon damage increases at 6th, 11th, 16th, 21st, 26th, and 31st levels, which also improves the damage done by maneuvers. If you want to do more damage with a combat maneuver, you can take feats to improve your combat maneuvers, or use weapons which are good at certain combat maneuvers.

The type of damage dealt is the same type as is dealt by the weapon you are wielding. If your weapon deals more than one type of damage, you can choose which type of damage (from among those types) is inflicted by the maneuver.

If you have natural or class-based non-weapon attacks, you may roll just the dice you would normally roll for an attack you are allowed to make during an attack of opportunity, not including any adders (such as enhancement bonuses, STR modifiers, feats, spell effects, precision damage, bonus damage, etc).

You may always choose not to deal any damage with a combat maneuver, if you prefer.

Example: a 3rd level fighter would roll just the dice from their +1 longsword (1d8), while a 3rd level Monk would roll just the dice of their Echoing Strike attack (2d8), and a 3rd level Brawler would roll just the dice of their Cross attack (also 2d8).
Consequences of Failure

If your check fails, the target is not Secured and you do not deal any damage. You may continue your turn if you have actions remaining.

Retry Allowed?

Yes

Provokes AOO?

No

Trip

Trip is a combat maneuver. You can never perform more than one combat maneuver per round, even if you have sufficient actions to do so. The only exception to this is spending an action point, where that action point grants you an action sufficient to perform another maneuver, in which case a second maneuver in the same round is permitted.

A Trip maneuver can be used to inflict the Quelled condition on an enemy creature, driving them to their knees.

You may attempt to trip any creature you threaten in melee, as long as that creature is no more than one size category larger than you.

Action Required:

Attack Action (i.e. as a standard action, or in place of any attack during a full attack action).

DC of Check:

The target's Maneuver Defense

Modifiers to Check

-

Take 10? / Take 20?

No

Allows Assists?

No

Results of Success

If your Trip combat maneuver result exceeds the target's Maneuver Defense, the target is Quelled.

If your Trip combat maneuver result is 5 points higher or more than the target's Maneuver Defense, the target is knocked Prone instead.

In addition to the special effects of the chosen maneuver, you may also deal damage to the creature equal to the base weapon damage of the weapon you are wielding, not including any adders (such as enhancement bonuses, STR modifiers, feats, spell effects, precision damage, bonus damage, etc). Note that base weapon damage increases at 6th, 11th, 16th, 21st, 26th, and 31st levels, which also improves the damage done by maneuvers. If you want to do more damage with a combat maneuver, you can take feats to improve your combat maneuvers, or use weapons which are good at certain combat maneuvers.

The type of damage dealt is the same type as is dealt by the weapon you are wielding. If your weapon deals more than one type of damage, you can choose which type of damage (from among those types) is inflicted by the maneuver.

If you have natural or class-based non-weapon attacks, you may roll just the dice you would normally roll for an attack you are allowed to make during an attack of opportunity, not including any adders (such as enhancement bonuses, STR modifiers, feats, spell effects, precision damage, bonus damage, etc).

You may always choose not to deal any damage with a combat maneuver, if you prefer.

Example: a 3rd level fighter would roll just the dice from their +1 longsword (1d8), while a 3rd level Monk would roll just the dice of their Echoing Strike attack (2d8), and a 3rd level Brawler would roll just the dice of their Cross attack (also 2d8).
Consequences of Failure

The target remains on their feet.

Retry Allowed?

Yes

Provokes AOO?

No

Apply Poison

You can apply a poison to a weapon or a piece of ammunition, which deals additional damage to a foe struck and potentially inflicts a status condition, based on the poison used.

Note that, while it takes a standard action to apply poison to a weapon, the weapon is considered 'poisoned' until the end of the next encounter (or current encounter, if it is applied during combat), the end of your next full night's rest, or after 24 hours, whichever occurs sooner. To apply the poison to a creature, simply hit it with the poisoned weapon.

A single dose of poison can coat a single weapon such that the poison persists through the entire encounter, but it can only apply poison to the first successfully hit target each round. Any hits after the first in the same round, even if they are part of the same attack action (such as a Cleave or Whirlwind attack), only apply poison to the first target successfully hit, and all subsequent targets are unaffected by the poison (as if the weapon were not poisoned).

If poison is applied to ammunition, a single dose of poison can affect up to three pieces, but the poisoned ammunition gets used up whether it hits or misses its target. Poisoned pieces of ammunition, like poisoned weapons, lose their efficacy at the end of the next encounter (or the current encounter, if the poison is applied during combat, after your full night's rest, or after 24 hours, whichever is sooner), whether it is used or not.

Creatures struck by a poisoned weapon must make a Fortitude saving throw against the poison or suffer its damage and status condition (if any). The DC of the Fortitude save is based on the Potency Level of the poison used. If the target succeeds on this save, they are completely unaffected by the poison. Creatures that fail the save suffer a number of points of damage equal to the Potency Level of the poison, plus a status condition as defined by the specific type of poison used. Thus, higher Potency Level poisons are significantly better than lower Potency Level poisons, but they are also costlier and more hazardous to use. See the Poisons page for details on individual poisons, their costs, and effects.

Unlike poisons and venoms used by monsters, player poisons do not have ongoing effects, except as defined by the status condition they inflict (e.g. bleed). Other than the effects of the status condition, the struck creature does not take additional damage from the poison in subsequent rounds. Of course, you can poison the same target again in the following rounds, to inflict more poison damage (and weapon damage), but the status conditions inflicted by a poison cannot be made stronger through multiple applications of the poison.

Action Required:

Standard action

DC of Check:

A Challenging DC based on the CR of the poison being applied.

Modifiers to Check
  • Hasty Application: You can attempt to apply poison during combat as a move action, instead of a standard action, but doing so increases the target DC by +5.
  • Reckless Application: You can attempt to apply poison during combat as a swift action, instead of a standard action, but doing so increases the target DC by +10.
  • Poison Use (Class Feature): If you have the poison use class feature, you can never fail by 5 or more when applying poison to a weapon (even on a natural 1 result on the check). Instead, any failure result is treated as a normal failure.
Take 10? / Take 20?

You can take 10 outside of combat. If you have the poison use class feature, you may take 20 when applying a poison to a weapon outside of combat.

Allows Assists?

No

Results of Success

You successfully apply the poison to the weapon or piece of ammunition. You must still make an attack and hit with the weapon in order to inflict the poison's effects on a target.

Consequences of Failure

Failure: If you fail by 4 or less, you fail to apply the poison to the weapon, and the dose of poison is wasted (consumed).

Critical Failure: If you fail by 5 or more, or roll a natural 1 on the check, you accidentally apply the poison to yourself, immediately suffering the effects of the poison. If you have the poison use class feature, you cannot fail an apply poison check by 5 or more, even on a natural 1 result. In that case, the result is always treated as a simple failure by 4 or less.

Retry Allowed?

Yes, if you have additional doses of the poison.

Provokes AOO?

No

BAM! Face Stab!

You can use sleight of hand to draw a light weapon and attack a single adjacent creature as a standard action. While anyone can draw a weapon, you can draw one in such a way that the target doesn't suspect you are about to attack. You're just in the middle of an anecdote about your dotty Aunt Hildegarde, and how she loves to tell stories about the adventures of her houseplants, when BAM!, you stab the guy in the face!

Once you declare you are using BAM! Face Stab!, the GM rolls the target's Perception check to set your DC, and then applies any relevant modifiers. You then make your sleight of hand check to see if you succeed in surprising the target. If successful, the attack is resolved as a surprise round. A surprised opponent is usually flat-footed until they can act (which is usually in the first full round of combat).

Action Required:

Standard action

DC of Check:

the target's Perception result

Modifiers to Check
  • Alert: If you are attempting the check on someone who is on the lookout for trouble, or suspicious of you, the DC is increased by +5.
  • Inconvenient: If you are attempting the check on someone who is inconveniently placed, the DC is increased. Some examples are: Sitting down, +2, standing behind a counter, +4, sitting at a table or desk, +5, behind a peephole or murder hole, +20.
  • Witty Buildup: If your role-playing prior to your duplicitous assault was particularly entertaining, the GM may reduce the DC by anywhere from -2 (for pretty good role-playing) to -10 (for crazy, over-the-top role-playing you'll be talking about years from now).
Take 10? / Take 20?

No

Allows Assists?

Yes (up to 5 allies). Assisting allies must have ranks in sleight of hand.

Results of Success

The standard action is made as your action during the surprise round, granting you a single attack with the light weapon you drew against the target as though they are flat-footed (unless the target has some ability like Uncanny Dodge, that prevents flat-footed).

Consequences of Failure

The target saw the threat before you could make your move. Roll initiative and resolve the combat without a surprise round.

Retry Allowed?

No

Provokes AOO?

No

Quick Swap

You can use sleight of hand to hold two small items in one hand at the same time (e.g. dagger plus a potion, two alchemical items, careen plus siangham, etc). You may choose which item to use each round without dropping the other item. The item you are not using provides no benefit, exactly as if it is in storage on your person. You may only do this with one hand at a time, and never with more than two items.

The exact definition of what constitutes a small item is up to the GM, but generally includes any potion or alchemical item, or any weapon with the Concealable quality. Light weapons and bucklers are possible, but slightly more difficult. You may even attempt to use quick swap with one-handed weapons, or a light shield, at an increased DC (see modifiers, below). You may not attempt quick swap with 2-handed weapons, heavy shields, or other bulky items.

Action Required:

Swift action each round to either swap between items, or maintain your grip on both items while using one. (I.e. you must spend a swift action and make a check each round you attempt this, even if you don't swap.)

DC of Check:

25

Modifiers to Check
  • Light Weapons and Bucklers: Attempting to include a light weapon and/or a buckler among the two items being held/swapped increases the DC by +5.
  • One-Handed Weapons and Light Shields: Attempting to include a one-handed weapon and/or a light shield among the two items being held/swapped increases the DC by +15.
  • Quicker Maintenance: If you don't want to swap between items this round, you can attempt to maintain your grip on both items as a free action (instead of a swift action), but the DC increases by +25.
Take 10? / Take 20?

No

Allows Assists?

No

Results of Success

You swap between the two held items, allowing the use of the now-readied item. You continue to hold the second item in your hand.

Consequences of Failure

If you fail by 4 or less, you are simply unable to swap between the two items this round.

If you fail by 5 or more, or roll a natural 1 on the die, you drop the item you were switching to. It falls into your space (and can be retrieved with a move action, or as part of a move action). Breakable objects, such as potions and alchemical fire do not have a chance to break from this failure. (Having to pick it back up is mean enough.)

In all cases, failure means you may only use the item which was previously readied in that hand.

Retry Allowed?

Assuming you didn't drop the second item, you may try again next round.

Provokes AOO?

No

Plant Object

You can use sleight of hand to hide a small object on someone else, as long as they are within your reach. Sleight of hand does not allow you to camouflage an unattended object in place (that is the domain of Disguise).

The exact definition of what constitutes a small item is up to the GM, but generally includes any potion or alchemical item, or any weapon with the Concealable quality. Light weapons and bucklers are possible, but slightly more difficult. You may even attempt to plant one-handed weapons, or a light shield, at an increased DC (see modifiers, below). You may not attempt plant object with 2-handed weapons, heavy shields, or comparably bulky items.

Action Required:

Standard action

DC of Check:

Opposed by the target's Perception check

Modifiers to Check
  • Alert: If you are attempting the check on someone who is on the lookout for trouble, or suspicious of you, the DC is increased by +5.
  • Inconvenient: If you are attempting the check on someone who is inconveniently placed, the DC is increased. Some examples are: Sitting down, +2, standing behind a counter, +4, sitting at a table or desk, +5, behind a peephole or murder hole, +20.
  • Witty Buildup: If your role-playing prior to your duplicitous assault was particularly entertaining, the GM may reduce the DC by anywhere from -2 (for pretty good role-playing) to -10 (for crazy, over-the-top role-playing you'll be talking about years from now).
  • Too Many Eyes: For each non-friendly creature who can see you (not including the target), the DC is increased by +1.
  • Baggy Clothes: If the target is wearing a cloak or baggy clothing, suitable for stuffing loot into, the DC is reduced by -2.
  • Light Weapons and Bucklers: Attempting to plant a light weapon and/or a buckler (or something of comparable size) increases the DC by +5.
  • One-Handed Weapons and Light Shields: Attempting to plant a one-handed weapon and/or a light shield (or something of comparable size) increases the DC by +15.
Take 10? / Take 20?

No

Allows Assists?

Yes (up to 5 allies). Assisting allies must have ranks in sleight of hand.

Results of Success

You are able to place the item inside the clothing, backpack, bag, or other storage of the target creature, strongly implying the object belongs to them.

Consequences of Failure

You are able to place the item inside the clothing, backpack, bag, or other storage of the target creature, strongly implying the object belongs to them. However, the target notices you doing so.

Retry Allowed?

No

Provokes AOO?

No

Magic Tricks (Epic)

It is possible to make a small object 'dance' and move about in your grasp and even at a small distance away with a sufficiently high sleight of hand skill roll. You can also pull seemingly linked rings apart, pick the right card from a deck of playing cards, or pull a live dove out of your hat. These are all feats of actual magic, albeit minor, which cannot be done within the confines of an anti-magic zone.

Successfully performing magic tricks can entertain a small audience, or serve as a distraction for the rest of your party, as the situation requires.

This is an epic skill use, and requires at least 21 ranks in the skill before it may be attempted.

Action Required:

Typically several minutes or longer, but at minimum a standard action.

DC of Check:
  • Small Crowd: Average DC against the creature with the lowest CR in the audience, with a +1 modifier for every other person you wish to entertain.
  • Moderate Crowd: You may choose to start with a Hard DC against the creature with the lowest CR in the audience, to instead add a +1 modifier per 10 people in the crowd.
  • Large Crowd: You may choose to start with a Hard DC against the creature with the lowest CR in the audience, to instead add a +1 modifier per 100 people in the crowd.
  • Massive Crowd: You may choose to start with a Impossible DC against the creature with the lowest CR in the audience, to instead add a +1 modifier per 1,000 people in the crowd.
Modifiers to Check
  • Quality of the Crowd: the kind of crowd you are playing to affects your performance DC:
Type of Crowd Description DC Modifier
Hostile Crowd would rather fight or do anything else than be entertained +10
Rowdy Crowd is drunk, prone to heckling, not really interested in what you're selling +5
Indifferent Crowd didn't really come here to be entertained, but doesn't hate the idea 0
Warmed-Up A previous performer or some other event has gotten the crowd in the mood to be entertained -5
Eager The crowd is looking forward to your show, and came here just to see it -10
  • Venue: Some venues are better suited to performing in front of large crowds than others. If the people in the back can't hear or see you, it will be much harder to impress them.
Venue Description DC Modifier
Terrible This place was never designed for performances, and its design actively inhibits success +10
Bad Numerous pockets and 'dead zones' prevent sections of the audience from appreciating your art +5
Average Designed for performances, probably has a stage 0
Enhanced Uses low-level magic to boost sound or improve sight lines -5
Legendary Magically ensorcelled such that each member of the audience can see and hear you as though you are right next to them. -10
  • Complexity: You can deliberately choose to perform magic tricks which are very difficult, in order to demonstrate your talent to your audience. You may increase the DC by up to +20 prior to making your check to reflect the difficulty of your chosen act.
Take 10? / Take 20?

You can take 10, but you cannot take 20.

Allows Assists?

Yes (up to 5 allies). Assisting allies must have ranks in sleight of hand.

Results of Success

You improve the general mood of your audience. This can have any number of effects, but generally grants a circumstance bonus to interact with your audience for the next hour or so. Audience members are more inclined to buy you drinks, share gossip, or relate information to you, to get to know you better or get into your good graces. After an hour, the 'high' of the performance wears off, and this benefit is lost.

GM's are encouraged to grant a circumstance bonus to interaction rolls, which should vary from +1 to +5 for opposed checks, or as high as +10 or even +20 for checks vs. flat DC's. The quality of the performance, and how well the performance fits within the culture and general preferences of the crowd should factor into the bonus granted.

Consequences of Failure

The crowd is unimpressed with your show. You gain no benefits from the performance, and likely suffer some rather hurtful heckling.

Retry Allowed?

No. You must wait at least 24 hours before attempting to perform in front of the same (or mostly the same) crowd.

Provokes AOO?

Yes

Obfuscate Ability (Epic)

It is possible to make a sleight of hand check to conceal the use of class abilities or skills. For example, the Paladin's Lay on Hands ability can be used with no one noticing. This can also be used on many skill checks as well, such as Barter checks to scan an area for the most valuable magical items, Heal checks to assess the health of a creature, and even Escape Artist checks to get out of bindings while people are watching you.

This is an epic skill use, and requires at least 21 ranks in the skill before it may be attempted.

Action Required:

Increases the base time required for the class ability or skill use being performed by 1 step, per the table below:

Free action
Swift or Immediate action
Move action
Standard action
Full attack action
Full-round action
Less than 1 minute (10 rounds)
1 minute (10 rounds)
10 minutes
1 hour
1 day
1 week
1 month
1 year
DC of Check:

Increases the DC of the class ability or skill use by +5.

If the class ability does not have a listed DC, the DC is instead a Hard DC versus the CR/lvl of the highest level creature affected (including yourself), or the CR of the area, or campaign level, whichever seems most appropriate.

In some cases, the GM may rule that the DC is an opposed Perception check by the highest-level non-friendly observer.

Modifiers to Check
  • Alert: If you are attempting the check on someone who is on the lookout for trouble, or suspicious of you, the DC is increased by +5.
  • Too Many Eyes: For each non-friendly creature who can see you after the first, the DC is increased by +1.
Take 10? / Take 20?

If the class ability or skill use which you are trying to hide allows you to take 10, you may do so. You may not take 20.

Allows Assists?

Yes (up to 5 allies). Assisting allies must have at least 21 ranks in sleight of hand.

Results of Success

You are able to perform the class ability or skill use without being noticed.

Consequences of Failure

If you fail by 4 or less, you still succeed in performing the class ability or skill use, but you are observed while doing so.

If you fail by 5 or more, or roll a natural 1 on the die, you fail to successfully use the class ability or skill use, and you are observed making the attempt.

Retry Allowed?

No,though you can retry the class ability or skill use you were trying to hide, if it allows a retry. You just can't try to hide the fact that you are doing so, since you've already been spotted.

Provokes AOO?

As the class ability or skill use being hidden

Apparently Mundane Item (Epic)

You can use sleight of hand to conceal the fact that a magic item you are wielding or wearing is, in fact, magical at all. You can't use this on anything too big to wield or wear, so you can't make your enchanted flying ship, or magic carpet, look non-magical. The object you wish to make appear non-magical must be on your person, or being touched by you.

This is a magical ability (classed as an illusion, for purposes of any feats or abilities which might modify those), and cannot be performed in an area of non-magic, such as an anti-magic zone.

You must make this check once per round any time you are being observed, for as long as you wish to maintain the effect.

This is an epic skill use, and requires at least 21 ranks in the skill before it may be attempted.

Action Required:

Move action

DC of Check:

Opposed by the Perception check of the highest-level non-friendly observer

Modifiers to Check
  • Quick Conceal: You can attempt to make the object appear mundane as a swift action (instead of a move action) by increasing the DC by +5.
  • Too Many Eyes: For each non-friendly creature who can see you after the first, the DC is increased by +1.
  • Frisking: If a non-friendly observer is patting you down to look for hidden weapons, the DC is increased by +4.
  • Detect Magic: If a non-friendly observer is using some form of magical detection to explicitly scan for the presence of magic, the DC is increased by +5.
Take 10? / Take 20?

You can take 10, but you cannot take 20.

Allows Assists?

No

Results of Success

You are able to mask the fact that the item is magically enchanted. Observers believe the item to be non-magical.

Consequences of Failure

You are unable to make the object appear non-magical. Any observer looking for such things will have a chance of noticing its enchantment. Enchantments that are obvious (such as a flaming sword) will be noticeably magical to anyone who sees them.

Retry Allowed?

No

Provokes AOO?

No